PLAYER          POS       COLLEGE   G  YRS HT    WT
Roger Ashmore     T       Gonzaga  13    1 6- 1 212
Bullet Baker      B           USC  12    1 6- 0 177
James Bowdoin     G       Alabama  11    1 6- 2 220
Tiny Cahoon       T       Gonzaga  10    3 6- 2 235
Boob Darling      C        Beloit   7    2 6- 3 216
Lavvie Dilweg     E     Marquette  12    2 6- 3 202
Red Dunn          B     Marquette  12    2 6- 0 178
Jug Earp          T      Monmouth  13    7 6- 1 235
PLAYER          POS       COLLEGE   G  YRS HT    WT
Harold Griffen    C          Iowa   5    1 5- 9 238
Thomas Hearden    B    Notre Dame   1    2 5- 9 175
Bruce Jones       G       Alabama  13    2 6- 0 165
Eddie Kotal       B      Lawrence  12    4 5-10 165
Curly Lambeau     B    Notre Dame   8    8 6- 0 190
Verne Lewellen    B      Nebraska  13    5 6- 2 181
John Lollar       B       Samford   3    1 6- 0 200
Larry Marks       B       Indiana  11    1 5-11 185
Bo Molenda
1928 PRE-SEASON RESULTS (1-0)
SEPTEMBER (1-0)
16 MINNEAPOLIS MARINES                   W 19- 0    1-0-0    5,000
1928 RESULTS (6-4-3)
SEPTEMBER (0-1-1)
23 FRANKFORD YELLOWJACKETS (0-0-0)       L  9-19    0-1-0    6,500
30 CHICAGO BEARS (1-0-0)                 T 12-12    0-1-1    8,500
OCTOBER (3-1)
7  NEW YORK GIANTS (1-0-0)               L  0- 6    0-2-1    7,000
14 CHICAGO CARDINALS (1-1-0)             W 20- 0    1-2-1    4,200
21 at Chicago Bears (2-0-1)              W 16- 6    2-2-1   15,000
PLAYER          POS       COLLEGE   G  YRS HT    WT
Paul Minick       G          Iowa        1 5-11 210
Bo Molenda        B      Michigan   4    1 5-11 208
Tom Nash          E       Georgia   8    1 6- 3 210
Harry O'Boyle     B    Notre Dame  11    1 5-10 196
Dick O'Donnell    E     Minnesota  13    5 5-10 196
Claude Perry      T       Alabama  13    2 6- 1 211
Howard Webber     E     Kansas St   3    1 6- 0 185
Whitey Woodin     G     Marquette  10    7 5-11 206
1928 IN REVIEW
The Packers beat the Bears twice in Chicago, but struggle against the rest of the league and end up with an unrewarding 6-4-3 record.
FINANCIAL EVENTS THAT SAVED THE PACKERS
A.B. Turnbull’s actions, 1922-23 - When rain threatened to keep fans away and bankrupt the Packers, Turnbull told Lambeau and George Calhoun to play their games and that he’d bail them out of debt. Turnbull then organized local investors, turned team into non-profit organization in 1923, and raised $1,000 in team’s first stock drive. Decision to play games in Milwaukee, 1933 - Allowed Packers to tap larger market. As a result, the Packers now have one of the largest territories in sports (the NFL has traditionally given teams only 75-mile radius). By playing in both Green Bay and Milwaukee (1939-94), Packers thwarted any efforts to establish another pro football team there. Court decision to appoint receiver, 1935 - After fan who fell from City Stadium bleachers sued Packers, team petitioned for friendly receiver, while litigation ran its course. Henry Graass, circuit court judge and Packers fan, appointed local accountant Frank Jonet as receiver. Despite Great Depression, Packers prospered during receivership (1934-37), thanks in part to growing popularity of NFL. Second stock drive, 1935 - President Lee Joannes raises $15,000 in “Save the Packers” stock drive, getting donations from firefighters, policemen, high-school students, housewives, civic leaders and other citizens. Joe Carr’s sending Don Hutson to Green Bay, 1935 - College star signed two contracts, including one with Brooklyn football Dodgers. League President Joe Carr awarded Hutson to Packers because team’s contract was postmarked earlier. Hutson, pivotal in timely 1936 world championship and greatest player in Green Bay history, helped team to climb out of court receivership. NFL’s installation of college draft, 1936 - Kept small-market teams such as Packers competitive with big-city teams. Lee Joannes donation, 1937 - Packers president paid $6,000 to settle case of fan who fell from stands in 1934, then convinced court to end receivership period. Decision to invest in war bonds, 1940s - Money in reserve carried team despite losses of at least $25,000 in 1943 alone, as World War II depleted rosters. Intrasquad game, Thanksgiving 1949 - Packers brought old-timers back, drawing 15,000 fans and earning $50,000. Third stock drive, 1950 - After Lambeau’s departure, team raised nearly $118,000. Bert Bell’s push for league-wide TV package, 1950s - With help from Congress, commissioner laid groundwork for CBS-TV deal that allowed all teams, large market and small market, to share revenue, eventually in place by the 1961 season. In 1966, Pete Rozelle signed first NFL TV package, with CBS and NBC, giving Packers more than $1 million (which allowed Vince Lombardi to sign Donny Anderson to the team’s first long-term contract). (SOURCE: Packer Media Guide)
28 DAYTON TRIANGLES (0-4-0)              W 17- 0    3-2-1    3,100
NOVEMBER (2-2-1)
4  POTTSVILLE MAROONS (1-2-0)            W 26-14    4-2-1    5,000
11 NEW YORK YANKEES (1-6-0)              T  0- 0    4-2-2    5,000
18 at New York Giants (4-2-1)            W  7- 0    5-2-2   12,000
25 at Pottsville Maroons (1-7-0)         L  0-26    5-3-2    1,600
29 at Frankford Yellowjackets (8-2-2)    L  0- 2    5-4-2    8,000
DECEMBER (1-0-1)
2  at Providence Steam Roller (8-1-1)    T  7- 7    5-4-3    9,000
9  at Chicago Bears (7-3-1)              W  6- 0    6-4-3   14,000
1928 PACKERS POCKET SCHEDULE
(Courtesy of Titletownnostalgia.com)
Rare find: 1928 Packers recruiting letter - Green Bay Press Gazette (November 21st 2014)