PLAYER                 POS        COLLEGE  G PR YR   HT  WT
Nate Barragar            C           USC  12  4  3 6- 0 210
Hank Bruder              B  Northwestern  13  4  4 6- 0 190
Art (Red) Bultman        C      Marquette     4  3 6- 2 199
Frank Butler             C    Michigan St  3  1  1 6- 3 246
Charles Casper           B            TCU  1  1  1 6- 0 195
LaVern Dilweg            E      Marquette 12  9  8 6- 3 202
Tiny Engebretsen       G-T   Northwestern     3  1 6- 1 235
Lon Evans              G-T            TCU 12  2  2 6- 2 225
Milt Gantenbein          E      Wisconsin 10  4  4 6- 0 199
Buckets Goldenberg       B      Wisconsin 11  2  2 5-10 220
Roger Grove              B    Michigan St 11  4  4 6- 0 175
Arnie Herber             B          Regis 12  5  5 5-11 208
Clarke Hinkle           FB       Bucknell 12  3  3 5-11 200
Swede Johnston           B      Marquette  1  3  2 5-10 200
Robert Jones             G        Indiana 12  1  1 6- 0 216
PLAYER                 POS        COLLEGE  G PR YR   HT  WT
Carl (Bud) Jorgensen   T-G St. Marys (CA) 10  1  1 6- 2 200
Joe Kurth                T     Notre Dame  7  2  2 6- 3 202
Joe Laws                 B           Iowa 13  1  1 5- 9 180
August (Mike) Michalske  G     Penn State 13  8  6 6- 1 215
Bob Monnett              B    Michigan St 11  2  2 5- 9 180
Al Nordgard              E       Stanford 10  1  1 6- 0 193
Claude Perry             T        Alabama 13  8  8 6- 1 211
Lester Peterson          E          Texas 11  4  2 6- 0 211
Al Rose                  E          Texas 10  5  3 6- 3 195
Ade Schwammel            T      Oregon St 13  1  1 6- 2 230
Champ Seibold            G      Wisconsin  1  1  1 6- 4 240
Earl Witte               B Gust. Adolphus  5  1  1 6- 1 187
Harry Wunsch             G     Notre Dame  2  1  1 5-11 210
G - Games  Played PR - Years of Pro Football YR - Years with Packers
1934 IN REVIEW
During a 7-6 season, the very existence of the Packers is threatened due to a 1932 court case involving a fan falling out of the stands at City Stadium. The fan wins a $5,000 verdict, which put the insurance company out of business. The Packers would go into receivership, and were about to fold, but Green Bay businessmen came to the rescue after the 1934 season, making the year a success despite the less-than-spectacular record.
BAD BLEACHERS AND NEAR BANKRUPTCY
In the first 18 years of their history, the Packers have had many narrow escapes. In 1922, when their sponsors owed $1,600 in back salaries, local businessmen formed a corporation to finance the team. The Packers repaid their benefactors by attracting as many as 15,000 spectators to a single Green Bay game. Then, the fates turned fickle. Willard Bent, a fan, fell off the grandstand in 1932 and sued the team for $20,000. In March 1933, he won a $5,200 award from the courts. Since the insurance company with which the Packers were insured went into bankruptcy during the trial and was a mutual company, the franchise was forced to pay the settlement, resulting in the Packers' debt balloning up to $10,000 and heading into receivership. It appeared the Packers were on the verge of folding or moving. In fact, a December 1933 article in the Chicago Tribune, claimed "the Green Bay Packers will move to Milwaukee next fall and if the change is not made then it certainly will be made in 1935".  The Packers had played one game in Milwaukee in 1933, under pressure from league officials after an expansion application was received in 1930 and 1931. The game attracted 12,467 fans, two thousand of them coming down from Green Bay. In 1934, Green Bay played two home games in Milwaukee, though did not move permanently. NFL officials gave the team one last chance to improve its financial position. In early 1935, the Green Bay Association of Commerce kicked off a $10,000 fundraising campaign through the sale of nonvoting stock. $13,029 was raised and the Packer survived, once again, to play another day.
1934 PRE-SEASON RESULTS (1-0)
SEPTEMBER (1-0)
9  G-FORT ATKINSON BLACKHAWKS            W 28- 7    1-0-0    4,000
1934 RESULTS (7-6)
SEPTEMBER (2-1)
16 G-PHILADELPHIA EAGLES (0-0-0)         W 19- 6    1-0-0    5,000
23 G-CHICAGO BEARS (0-0-0)               L 10-24    1-1-0   13,500
30 M-NEW YORK GIANTS (0-1-0)             W 20- 6    2-1-0   11,000
OCTOBER (2-2)
7  G-DETROIT LIONS (2-0-0)               L  0- 3    2-2-0    7,500
14 G-CINCINNATI REDS (0-4-0)             W 41- 0    3-2-0    3,000
21 G-CHICAGO CARDINALS (2-2-0)           W 15- 0    4-2-0    4,000
28 at Chicago Bears (6-0-0)              L 14-27    4-3-0   11,000
NOVEMBER (2-3)
4  at Boston Redskins (4-3-0)            W 10- 0    5-3-0   23,722
11 at New York Giants (5-3-0)            L  3-17    5-4-0   22,000
18 M-CHICAGO CARDINALS (3-5-0)           L  0- 9    5-5-0    3,000
25 at Detroit Lions (10-0-0)             W  3- 0    6-5-0   12,000
29 at Chicago Cardinals (4-6-0)          L  0- 6    6-6-0    1,738
DECEMBER (1-0)
2  at St. Louis Gunners (1-9-0)          W 21-14    7-6-0    6,300
G - Green Bay M - Milwaukee
The penmanship of NFL pioneer Curly Lambeau (1898-1965) remains one of the hobby's most scarce football signatures, and here offered is an ideally potent example. Lambeau's message to University of Iowa guard/defensive end Francis "Zud" Schammel was typed on "Green Bay Football Corporation" letterhead, and the letter reads: "Dear 'Zud': - I have been expecting your signed contract every day, but at the present writing have not heard from you. I should like very much to have your signature and will promise not to give any publicity until I have your permission. - With kindest regards, - Sincerely, (signed) Curly Lambeau."