GAME RECAP (GREEN BAY PRESS-GAZETTE)
(MILWAUKEE) - They put on a great football show here last night under the State Fair park floodlights and some 7,000 Milwaukee fans found it good. The Green Bay Packers lost again to the Chicago Bears, however, 10 to 6, and as has been the case in the past
four previous games, the teams staged a great battle,
with honors evenly divided, only to have the Chicagoans
put on a late rally that brought victory. The game was 
an exhibition, and did not count in the National league
standings. The Bears won because they capitalized on
breaks. They played for the breaks, and got them,
connecting twice for scores as direct results of Packer
slips, one time recovering a fumbled Packer punt and
scoring a field goal after it and a few minutes later 
getting the ball after a low pass from center on fourth
down and counting a touchdown and extra point after it.
OPEN WITH PASSES
Green Bay opened with a running and passing attack in
the closing minutes that was good to watch. It carried
the team from its own goal to the Chicago line and 
brought a Packer touchdown. But it came too late and
all it could do was cut the margin of victory. On a few
previous occasions the Bays had invaded Bear territory,
but they couldn't keep up the attack against the Bears'
powerful outfit and were checked. Early in the second
period they got to the Bear 20 yard line and tried a
placement from the 26 but it failed. The game was 
replete with thrills, with more open football on display
than in any recent previous Bear-Packer battle. Green
Bay's line did a fine job, checking thrusts of Nagurski,
Ronzani, et al, time after time on the line of scrimmage.
Beattie Feathers, the giant young halfback from the 
south, and Keith Molesworth managed to break through
for a few substantial gains for the Bears with some 
clever bits of running, but when the Bays were backed
up by the dashes, they braced to toss back the 
invaders.
LAWS, HERBER STAR
Joe Laws and Arnold Herber were the only Packers 
able to get loose for substantial gains through the Bear
powerhouse. They helped put the ball in Bear territory
on a few occasions through excellent runs and Joe
scored Green Bay's only touchdown by a neat bit of
sidestepping and running a few seconds before the final
gun. Herber's passing also was an outstanding feature.
The Bears had the edge in punting, through the efforts
of Molesworth and Feathers. The Packers had several
chances to try their vaunted passing attack but except
in the final minutes few connected. On one occasion in
the fourth period what looked like a perfect touchdown
play failed when Roger Grove dropped a long toss from
Monnett with a clear field in front of him. The football
trickled out of Roger's fingers on the 20 yard line.
BOTH TEAMS KEYED
Both teams were keyed and fought all the time. On
offense they charged hard and blocked good but the
defensive play nearly always matched it. Not a major
penalty was called, but several offside and backfield in
motion penalties that should have been called, were
overlooked by careless officials. George Lawrie, head
linesman, Chicago, received a punch in the jaw from 
one infuriated Green Bay fan after the game. Lawrie has
done some good work as a referee in the circuit but he
missed some offside penalties last night. The Packers
were as good as the Bears both on offense and defense
as indicated by nine first downs for each squad. They
weren't able to beat them, not because they didn't try,
but because the Bears were just a little more alert all
the time. It might be argued that choice of Packer plays
was not always as good as it could have been, under
existing circumstances, such as waiting until the fourth
down to punt when deep in their own territory and failing
to open up with everything they had after the Bears had
scored three points. The Bears put together a pair of
first downs soon after the start to take the ball to the
midfield but the march was halted when Barragar
intercepted a pass by Feathers. The Packers punted
and the Bears came down the field again when Feathers got loose for two good runs. Feathers fumbled on the Packer 42, however, and Bruder recovered for Green Bay. The Bays were held and Herber punted out to the 23. Then the Packer line began to stiffen and after two plays failed the Bears kicked back, Laws taking the ball and coming back with a great 25 yard run to midfield before he was finally stopped.
LAWS BREAK LOOSE
Laws broke loose on a spinner for 18 yards on a beautiful play and it was first down on the Bear 32. Herber circled right end for seven and Laws added five on another spinner. Bruder cracked the center and the ball was on the 17 yard line as the quarter ended. Monnett failed to gain and then tried a pass to Gantenbein which fell short. On fourth down, Monnett dropped back and with Laws holding the ball tried a placement from the 26. It fell short. The Bears connected on a pass to Karr later in the period to move the ball near midfield but the Packers held and the Chicagoans had to punt, kicking the ball out of bounds on the 10 yard line. Hinkle's punt went only to the Bay 37 yard line. The Bears started to smash hard at the Packer wall, and on four plays, made a first down on the 26. Feathers then passed to Brumbaugh for a first down on the Bay 12. Ronzani smashed over left tackle for six yards and it looked bad for the Bays. They held however, stopping Feathers after a two yard gain, throwing Ronzani for a loss and then stopping Feathers dead to take the ball on the five. The Bays kicked out safely and the Bears had the ball on the 39. After checking the Bruin attack and forcing them to punt, the Bays took the ball on their own ten and kicked back. Feathers returned to the 35 yard line. Manders came into the game to try a placekick, booting from the 42 yard line, but it fell far short and Monnett ran it out to the 20 as the half ended. A 29 yard run by Molesworth, dashing from punt formation, came soon after the start of the third period. It brought the ball to the Bear 48 yard mark. The Bears were held at that point, however, and had to punt, kicking over the goal. The Packers started a march from their own 20. Hinkle passed to Peterson for 12 yards to the 32. Grove broke loose over left tackle for 14 yards. Three plays netted nine yards, just short of a first down and the Bays had to kick.
A HIGH PUNT
Late in the period Molesworth got off a high punt to Monnett. The otherwise reliable Packer back fumbled the ball and Rosequist recovered for the Bears. The teams reversed goals for the start of the fourth period and on the first play Ronzani was tossed for a five yard loss by Hinkle. Masterson's pass was knocked down by Michalske. Manders then dropped back for a placekick. From a difficult side angle, he kicked from the 26 yard line, the ball sailing squarely through the uprights for three points. A few moments later, Hinkle, back to punt for Green Bay, had his kick blocked by Karr on the 19 yard line. The Bears were stopped in their tracks on two plays and on a third, Ronzani faded far back and passed to Joe Zeller, an ineligible man when he was tackled so the ball went to the Packers on the 25. Hinkle drove through center and then passed to Gantenbein for a first down on the 41. Hinkle hit center for eight yards. Monnett then faded far back and tried a long pass to Grove. Grove got his hands on the ball but couldn't hold it with a clear field in front of him. Hinkle punted out on the Bear 26.
THROWN FOR LOSS
After an exchange of punts Hinkle, on third down, was thrown on his 24 yard line for a 10 yard loss on an attempted pass play. He dropped back to punt but the ball came low from center and he fumbled, picked it up and tried to run, only to be downed on the 19. Feathers gained four at left end and then swept between tackle and guard on the right side on a quick cutback, to run 15 yards for a touchdown. Manders kicked for the extra point and it was 10 to 0. Hinkle ran back the Bear kickoff to the 36 yard line in a good play. Laws sliced through left tackle for six yards and Herber passed to Norgard for a 15 yard gain on the Bear 42 yard mark. Herber's pass to Dilweg was wide. Herber tried to pass again but found receivers covered so ran with the ball, picking up 16 yards in a good open field dash. Herber then passed to Hinkle who was forced out of bounds on the 14 yard line. It was a "sleeper" play with none covering Hinkle. Herber passed to Bruder who was forced out of bounds on the one yard mark. Bruder failed to gain at center but on the second play Laws cut over left tackle for a touchdown.The gun sounded but the Packers had a chance for the extra point. Bruder tried it, the kick being blocked.
CHICAGO -      0  0  0 10  - 10
GREEN BAY  -   0  0  0  6  -  6
4th - CHI - Jack Manders, 26-yard field goal CHICAGO BEARS 3-0
4th - CHI - Beattie Feathers, 15-yard run (Manders extra point) CHICAGO BEARS 10-0
4th - GB - Laws, 1-yard run (Bruder kick blocked) CHICAGO BEARS 10-6
NEWS AND NOTES
SIDELIGHTS
OCT 18 (Milwaukee) - George Lawrie, the head linesman, aroused the crowd's ire when he failed to call several glaring offsides on the Bears and had rather a
hectic time getting out of the park. As he walked off the
playing field, a crowd of about 25 fans surrounded him 
and heckled him. One fan vented his ire by walking up
to Lawrie, hitting him squarely on the button, sending
him sprawling on his back on the ground. Lawrie got up
rubbing his chin, but made no effort to avenge himself...
When Clark Hinkle caught his shoestring pass in the
final minutes of the game and ran for a touchdown, but
then was called back for running out of bounds, the 
crowd could no longer be held in check, and many Bay
rooters surged onto the field of play to protest the
decision. After play was resumed, the fans continued to
crowd along the sidelines, yelling encouragement to the
Packers and shouting not so kind words to the officials,
whose attempts to keep the crowd back were futile...In
fact when the gun went off after Joe Laws had crossed
the goal line for the Packer touchdown, the crowd filled
the playing field, and when Hank Bruder tried for the
extra point, several youngsters were standing intently
watching him about five feet away..."King Kong" Hewitt
again had a great time with the crowd on the sidelines.
If there is anything the big Bear end loves, it's being
heckled. However, on one play, he was having so much
fun yelling at the crowd that he almost missed it
entire. Hewitt was discovered on his back occasionally
last night, and Hank Bruder took him entirely out of one
play with a sweeping block...The shoestring "sleeper"
pass from Herber to Hinkle caught the Bears entirely
unawares. This play is not worked much in pro ball, and
everyone expected the national champs to notice Clark
near the sidelines, but they didn't, and had Herber's 
pass been a foot lower, Hinkle would not have had any
trouble catching the ball and walking over the goal line.
As it was he had to jump high for it and fell out of 
bounds after catching it. Hinkle was injured after he
caught the ball and was taken out of the game...Earl
Witte wanted to prove that Nagurski and Monnett were
not the only Minnesotans on the field last night, and he
did it quite proficiently. One time when the Bronk 
busted through the Bay line on one his bone crushing
plunges, Witte came up fast from the secondary and
picked the Bronk right up in the air while he was driving
forward and threw him back on his back. Another time
when Ronzani was plunging through the line, Witte
charged into him and hit him squarely in the head with
his chest. Ronzani stopped, curled up and dropped to
the ground as if he had hit a stone wall...Several
Marquette alumni were in the game last night to show
their former fans what they could do. Lavvie Dilweg, 
Packer end, was one of the most famous of these, but
Lavvie missed a beautiful chance to thrill his Marquette
rooters in the opening minutes of the game when he leaped into the air for a pass from Arnie Herber, but couldn't quite reach the ball. Gene Ronzani played a good part of the game for the Bears. Gene is another former Marquette gridiron hero...Rocky Wolf, Bear publicity agent, got his amusement last night by broadcasting over the loud speaker system and answering the crowd's taunts as fast as they threw them at him. Rocky is as rabid a Bear fan as any Green Bay residents are for the Packers, and he liked to make them look good in his broadcast. He had the Bronk taking the ball for substantial gains throughout the evening, when most of the time one of the Bear backs had taken the ball and perhaps lost a yard. Some fan asked him near the end of the game: "Say, who's the other team on the field." Rocky always had a quick answer ready...Jack Manders did good enough last night, but he didn't have a perfect record. Rocky had been telling of the exploits of the Minnesota fullback and his educated toe, when he came into the game to kick a field goal. After getting all set for the kick, the ball was snapped and Manders rolled it along the ground to Monnett, who was standing under the goal posts. However, Jack revenged himself later by kicking another field goal from a difficult angle and then getting himself a point after touchdown...Joe Laws went like a house-a-fire against the Bears. Every time he took the ball he was good for substantial yardage, and when that last yard was needed for the touchdown Joe went over left tackle standing up. He crossed the goal line without being touched. The running of Laws and Feathers was beautiful to watch, as both of these men are very shifty and have a sparkling change of pace...In the line it was hard to beat the work of Mike Michalske, who was knifing through and tossing Bear backs for losses at frequent intervals. When he wasn't through like a shot he could always be found in the pile around the runner somewhere. Norgard, at end, and Butler at center also did some good work in the line, Norgard giving additional evidence that he is learning the pro style of ball very quickly.
CHICAGO CARDS EXPECT TO WHIP BAYS
OCT 17 (Milwaukee) - Owner George  Bidwell, Coach Paul Schissler and some 20 odd players of the Chicago Cardinals staged a night school session at State Fair park here last evening while the Green Bay Packers and Bears were tangling on the turf. Owner Bidwell had the right slant when he hired a big bus and moved his entire squad here to witness the postgraduate gridiron fracas. These recruits to professional football, seven of whom were listed on the 1933 All-Americans, got an "eyeful" as the Bays and Bruins went at it hammer and tongs. Some of the Cards were heard to remark: "They're cracking out there!"...PLAY PACKERS SUNDAY: This Sunday the Cardinals play the Packers at Green Bay and Coach Schissler, along with the players, had notebooks out and were jotting down nearly every move Coach Lambeau's hirelings made. The passing of Herber and Michalske's brilliant line play came in for some heavy penciling from the Cardinals. Between halves Schissler was cornered for a question or two while Owner Bidwell stood close by apparently to act as censor. The Card mentor was asked about what happened last Sunday when the Bears took his club into camp by a 20 to 0 score and he replied: "We slipped a bit when the going was toughest", and he added "you want to remember I have the youngest club in the National league."...WARNS COACH LAMBEAU: Continuing Schissler said: "We are looking better at every start and I want to make a prediction right here that we will be on our game this Sunday at Green Bay. You can tell Curly Lambeau that he will have a battle on his hands from the opening whistle." Bidwell horned into the conversation with the remark that Homer Griffith, his star back from Southern California, would probably start against the Packers and that Pardonner, the great quarterback from Purdue, would be in the opening lineup. Bidwell sang the praises of Mike Mikulak, his big fullback from Oregon State, and went on record to the effect that he wouldn't trade big Mike for the "bone crushing Nagurski or Jack Manders of 'gifted toe' fame." The Cardinals will make the trip to Green Bay in a special car over the Milwaukee road, arriving at 10:20 p.m. Saturday. While in Green Bay the Cards will headquarter at the Beaumont hotel. According to Bidwell, several hundred Cardinals rooters will make the trip 
PACKERS WILL MAKE FINAL APPEARANCE AT HOME ON SUNDAY
OCT 18 (Green Bay) - The Green Bay Packers will make their final 1934 appearance at City Stadium in Green Bay Sunday when they meet the star-studded lineup representing the Chicago Cardinals. The kickoff is at 2 p.m. A vastly improved backfield, including Iron Mike Mikukak, all-American of Oregon in the Pacific Coast Conference, is supported by a radically altered line, all calculated to give the Packers an unpleasant afternoon...PLAYING BETTER BALL: The Bays, however, have been displaying a steadily improved brand of football despite their recent narrow losses, and figure to repel the Cardinal invasion without loss of blood. Their confidence does not detract from the fact that Sunday's game will rank right along with the Chicago Bears and Detroit Lions contests as an ace spectacle of the season. The Packers picked up a few new injuries against the Bears last Wednesday, although Clark Hinkle was shaken up severely near the end of the game. Furthermore, Coach E.L. Lambeau may possible use Buckets Goldenberg at this regular quarterback post, as the stocky Milwaukee veteran has displayed rapid recovery from his recent leg injury. ..CAHN TO REFEREE: A competent set of officials has been announced by Joe F. Carr, Columbus, O., including Bobby Cahn, Chicago, referee; Meyer Morris, Rock Island, umpire; K.H. Harris, Duluth, head linesman, and G.A. Brown, Kankakee, field judge. Mikulak is not the only hard running back of national reputation who will appear here Sunday, as the Cardinals' lineup includes such names as Homer Griffiths, Southern California halfback; Roy Horstmann, Purdue halfback; Dave Cook, Illinois halfback, and Paul Pardonner, Purdue quarterback...EQUAL OF MANDERS: This Pardonner is supposed to be the equal of the famed Jack Manders for goal kicking accuracy, although the former Boilermaker star disdains assistance on all his attempts, never using the placement type of kick. While with Purdue, Pardonner rarely missed a point after touchdown via the dropkick method. Sunday's game will be the first of three 1934 meetings between the Packers and Cardinals. The next such event will occur Sunday November 18 at Milwaukee and the last will be in Chicago Thanksgiving day November 29...BUTLER TAKES U.S. JOB: Frank Butler, husky recruit center from Michigan State, has turned in his uniform to Coach E.L. Lambeau of the Packers as he has accepted a contract with Uncle Sam to serve as a levee engineer which provides for a salary check the year around. Coach Lambeau is sorry to lose the aggressive snapperback as he had all the earmarks of a topnotch professional footballer. Butler will be stationed near Chicago, it is understood, and he will probably be a bench spectator at all the Packer games in the Windy City. With Butler out of the picture, Coach Lambeau still has two capable centers to work with as both Nate Barrager and Red Bultman have been playing splendid football this fall.
PACKERS HOLD EGDE
OCT 18 (Green Bay) - Although the Green Bay Packers hold a topheavy advantage over the Chicago Cardinals in the 19-game series between the two clubs, there apparently is little to choose between the teams as they prepare to resume their rivalry here Sunday afternoon. Since 1921 the Packers have defeated the Cardinals 11 times, the Chicago team has taken six victories and two games have ended in ties. The Bays have rolled up 196 points to 121 for their opponents. The first contest between the Packers and the Cardinals, occurring in 1921, was a great struggle, and it ended in a 3-all tie when Paddy Driscoll of the Cards and Lambeau of the Packers booted goals from the field...FIELD GOAL BY MATHYS: Charlie Mathys scored a field goal for the Packers in 1922, but the Horween boys, playing under the name of MacMahon, proved a tough pair and the Cards took a 16-3 decision. There was no game the following year, and in 1924 the Cardinals handed the Packers the only shutout in the long series, 3 to 0. The Chicago team followed this conquest with another drubbing in 1925, 9 to 6. In 1926, when two games were scheduled, Red Dunn of the Cardinals took a personal interest in whipping the Packers, but the 13 to 7 win was destined to be the last Chicago victory for many years. The Packers took their first victory over the Cardinals late in 1926, Pid Purdy kicking a field goal to hang up a 3 to 0 decision. The rivals played twice in 1927, the Packers playing steady ball here to take a 13 to 0 game, and the Cardinals played inspired ball at Chicago to tie the Green Bay crew, 6 to 6. The Packers dished out the worst defeat in the long series to the Cardinals in the lone game between the teams in 1928, the score being 20 to 0...SCORE THREE VICTORIES: In 1929 the Bays were sweeping to their first national championship, and they dealt out three defeats to the Cardinals, but all victories came only after terrific struggles. The scores were 9 to 2, 7 to 6 and 12 to 0. Touchdowns by Lewellen and Dilweg subdued the Cards, 14 to 0, in the first game of 1930, but Ernie Nevers' powerful team came back fast to break a
string of eight games in which the Cardinals had not
beaten the Packers. The score of the second game 
was 13 to 6, McCrary scoring for Green Bay and Nevers
and Belden getting the Chicago touchdowns. The Cards
handed the bays a nasty scare here in the first game
of their 1931 rivalry. After trailing 7 to 0 at the half, the
Packers swept back to score four touchdowns and 
chalk up a 26 to 7 win. In Chicago, Nevers again led a
victory march for the Cardinals, 21 to 13...BRUDER 
AND MICHALSKE: The Packers opened their 1932
National league season by walloping the Cardinals, 15
to 7, on touchdowns by Bruder and Michalske, an extra
point by O'Boyle, and a Chicago safety. Hill got all the
Card points, Then Johnny Blood ran wild at Chicago to
give the Bays a 19 to 9 win. He scored two touchdowns
and Hinkle got another. O'Boyle kicked one extra point.
Cardinals scoring came on Moynihan's touchdown,
Hill's extra point and a safety against the Bays. The teams met but once last season, with the Packers hanging up their third consecutive victory, 14 to 6. Nesbitt got the lone Cardinals touchdown. Monnett and Hinkle went over for the Packers, and extra points were scored by Monnett and Grove.
IRATE FAN TAKES PUNCH AT OFFICIAL
OCT 19 (Milwaukee) - At least one irate Green Bay Packer follower through that George Lawrie, head linesman, was too busy posing for the photographers to catch the numerous offsides and waited until after the game to put emphasis to his beliefs. The emphasis consisted of a solid right hand punch to the officials' jaw, flooring him. By the time he got up, the fan had bounded through the gate. Whereupon a wag remarked: "Just another offside you missed, Lawrie."
SCHISSLER EXPECTS HARD GAME AT GREEN BAY
OCT 19 (Chicago) - Chciago's two professional football teams face contrasting assignments Sunday but the coaches of both are determined to be prepared for any emergency. The Cardinals, who invade Green Bay, expect one of their hardest battles of the year, while the Bears meet Cincinnati, last place club in the National league, at Wrigley field. It will be ladies' day. The Cardinals have engaged in daily scrimmages all week, except for Monday, which was given over to reflection on the defeat at the hands of the Bears Sunday. Coach Paul Schissler said last night he is confident the offense, which made few gains against the Bear line, will show vast improvement at Green Bay.
PACKERS WILL MAKE FINAL APPEARANCE AT HOME SUNDAY
OCT 19 (Green Bay) - The Green Bay Packers will make their final 1934 appearance at City stadium Sunday when they meet the star-studded lineup representing the Cardinals of Chicago. The kickoff is at 2 p.m. A vastly improved backfield, including Iron Mike
Mikulak, all-American of Oregon in the Pacific coast
conference, is supported by a radically altered line, all
calculated to give the Packers an unpleasant afternoon..
.PLAYING BETTER BALL: The Bays, however, have
been displaying a steadily improved brand of football,
despite their recent narrow losses, and figure to repel
the Cardinal invasion without loss of blood. Their
confidence does not distract from the fact that Sunday's
game will rank right along with the Chicago Bears and
Detroit Lions contests are an ace spectacle of the 
season. The Packers packed up few new injuries versus
the Bears last Wednesday, although Clark Hinkle was
shaken up severely near the end of the game. Coach
E.L. Lambeau, furthermore, may possibly use Buckets
Goldenberg at his regular quarterback post, as the
stocky Milwaukee veteran has displayed rapid recovery
from his recent leg injury...CAHN TO REFERE: A
competent set of officials has been announced by Joe
F. Carr, Columbus, Ohio, including Bobby Cahn, 
Chicago, referee; Meyer Morris, Rock Island, umpire;
K.H. Harris, Duluth, head linesman; and G.A. Brown,
Kankakee, field judge. Mikulak is not the only hard
running back of national reputation that will appear here
on Sunday, as the Cardinals' lineup includes such 
names as Homer Griffith, Southern California halfback;
Roy Horstmann, Purdue halfback; Dave Cook, Illinois
halfback; and Paul Pardonner, Purdue quarterback...
EQUAL OF MANDERS: This Pardonner is supposed to
be the equal of the famed Jack Manders for field goal
accuracy, although the former Boilermaker star disdains
assistance on his attempts, never using the placement
type of kick. While with Purdue Pardonner rarely 
missed a point after touchdown via the dropkick method.
Sunday's game will be the first of three 1934 meetings
between the Packers and Cardinals. The next such
event will occur Sunday, Nov. 18 at Milwaukee, and the
last will be in Chicago Thanksgiving day, Nov. 29...
BUTLER TAKES U.S. JOB: Frank Butler, husky recruit
center from Michigan State, has turned in his uniform to
Coach Lambeau of the Packers as he has accepted a
contract with Uncle Sam to serve as a levee engineer
which provides for a salary check the year round. Coach
Lambeau is sorry to lose the aggressive snapperback as he had all the earmarks of a topnotch professional footballer. Butler will be stationed near Chicago, it is understood, and he will probably be a bench spectator at all the Packer games in the Windy City. With Butler out of the picture, Coach Lambeau still has two capable centers to work with as both Nate Barragar and Red Bultman have been playing splendid football this fall.
BOB MONNETT LEADS SCORERS
OCT 19 (New York) - Beattie Feathers, elusive halfback of the Chicago Bears, has stepped out so far ahead of his rivals for ground gaining honors in the National Professional Football league that it hardly looks like a race. Feathers has gained 511 yards so far in 47 attempts, averaging 11 yards every time he has carried the ball. Warren Heller of Pittsburgh is second with 364 yards in 82 tries for a four yard average. Swede Hanson of Philadelphia has averaged six yards a try, gaining 325 yards on 52 attempts. Heller, however, is among the passing leaders, having gained the high total of 377 with his aerials. Arnold (Flash) Herber of Green Bay and Harry Newman of the New York Giants, his rivals, have been more consistently successful with their tosses, however. Bob Monnett of Green Bay, league leading scorer with 28 points, also leads in field goals with four. George Lawrie, head linesman, who let Hewitt and the Bears' centers get away with everything but the rule book when it came to being offside. So, mates, we'll stick to our prediction that the Lions are the team to beat for the title and that Bears WILL slump and will do well to break even in their last six games of the season.
additional knowledge gleamed from the same writer's Remington. In this latest epistle from the recent addition to the sports writing ranks, a gentle knock is taken at this writer for predicting early in the season that the Bears would strike a slump as the season got into its later stages. He cites the Bears-Packers game Wednesday night as a glaring example of how the Bears "slumped": "Because we've been around football clubs, players, coaches and officials for many years, and have had some experience as player, coach and writer, during which time our contemporary was writing obits, features, sewing circle items for the city side, we're convinced that Wednesday night's game cannot be classed as a late season affair. That is, not with seven games remaining on the Bears' schedule. When the Bears hurdle the Detroit Lions, the best club in the league, twice, the Giants twice, Boston and the Packers, who still have one more game to play with Halas' club, we'll be convinced they can travel the route." After the game Wednesday night, the Bears were the first to admit that the Packers had improved 50 percent over their showing in the game at Green Bay three weeks ago. In the meantime, the Bears have improved, but not as greatly as the Bays who have more newcomers in their ranks. Although comparative scores mean little, there is no one who saw both games who won't admit that the Bays are on the way up at a rapid clip and that the Bears, with the toughest part of the road ahead, are improving but little...Our critic does not take into consideration that the Bays were beaten because they made two errors, a fumble of a punt and a wide pass from center on a fourth down punts, and that Buckets Goldenberg, the best blocked on the team and one of the defensive stars of the league, did not see any action. Too, the bad pass from center can be attributed to the poor officiating of 
GREEN BAY PACKERS PLAY LAST HOME GAME AGAINST CHICAGO CARDS TOMORROW
OCT 20 (Green Bay) - The Green Bay Packers will close their home season tomorrow in a game with the Chicago Cardinals of the National Professional Football league. Coach Curly Lambeau said he was much impressed with the recent showing of Joe Laws, who starred at the University of Iowa last year, and expressed the opinion the young halfback has hit his stride in pro football. Lambeau pointed out that it usually takes a newcomer several games to acquaint himself with the professional game. He said he plans to use the former Hawkeye more regularly now that he has "arrived". Buckets Goldenberg is still nursing an injured knee and probably will not see any action against the Cardinals. The Chicagoans boast a backfield which Lambeau considers equal to any in the league. Paul Pardonner, formerly of Purdue, is at quarterback. Roy Horstmann, another Boilermaker star, and "Iron Mike" Mikulak of Washington, carry the fullback burden. Rusell, Tipton, Hinchman, Cook, Murphy and Griffith alternate at the halves. Although the Green Bay Packers hold a topheavy advantage over the Chicago Cardinals in the 19-games series between the two clubs, there apparently is little to choose between the two teams as they prepare to resume their rivalry here Sunday afternoon. Since 1921 the Packers have defeated the Cardinals 11 times, the Chicago team has taken six victories and two games have ended in ties. The Bays have rolled up 196 points to 121 for their opponents. The first contest between the Packers and the Cardinals, occurring in 1921, was a great struggle, and it ended in a 3-all tie when Paddy Driscoll of the Cards and Lambeau of the Packers booted goals from the field. Charlie Mathys scored a field goal for the Packers in 1922, but the Horween boys, playing under the name of McMahon, proved a tough paid, and the Cards took a 16 to 3 decision. There was no game the following year, and in 1924 the Cardinals handed the Packers the only shutout in the long series, 3 to 0. The Chicago team followed this conquest with another drubbing in 1925, 9 to 6. In 1926, when two games were scheduled, Red Dunn of the Cardinals took a personal interest in whipping the Packers, but the 13 to 7 win was destined to be the last Chicago victory for many years. The Packers took their first victory over the Cardinals late in 1926, Pid Purdy kicking a field goal to hang up a 3 to 0 decision. The rivals played twice in 1927, the Packers playing steady ball here to take a 13 to 0 game, and the Cardinals playing inspired ball at Chicago to tie the Green Bay crew, 6 to 6. The Packers dished out the worst defeat in the long series to the Cardinals in the lone game between the teams in 1928, the score being 20 to 0. In 1929 the Bays were sweeping to their first national championship, and they dealt out three defeats to the Cardinals, but all victories came only after terrific struggles. The scores were 9 to 2, 7 to 6 and 12 to 0. Touchdowns by Lewellen and Dilweg subdued the Cards, 14 to 0, in the first game of 1930, but Ernie Nevers' powerful team came back fast to break a string of eight games in which the Cardinals had not beaten the Packers. The score of the second game was 13 to 6, McCrary scoring for Green Bay and Nevers and Belden getting the Chicago touchdowns. The Cardinals handed the Bays a nasty scare here in the first game of their 1931 rivalry. After trailing 7 to 0 at the half, Green Bay swept back to score four touchdowns and chalk up a 26 to 7 win. In Chicago Nevers again led a victory march for the Cardinals, 21 to 13. The Packers opened their 1932 National league season by walloping the Cardinals, 15 to 7, on touchdowns by Bruder and Michalske, an extra point by O'Boyle, and a Chicago safety. Hill got all the Card points. Then Johnny Blood ran wild at Chicago to give the Bays a 19 to 9 victory. Blood scored two touchdowns and Hinkle got another. O'Boyle kicked one extra point. Cardinal scoring came from Moynihan's touchdown, Hill's extra point, and a safety against the Bays. The teams met once last season, with the Packers hanging up their third consecutive victory, 14 to 6. Nesbitt got the lone Cardinal touchdown. Monnett and Hinkle went over for the Packers, and extra points were scored by Monnett and Grove.
PACKERS WIND UP 1934 HOME SEASON
OCT 20 (Green Bay) - Green Bay's Packers will make their last home stand of the year here tomorrow meeting the formidable Chicago Cardinal eleven in what promises to be one of the best games of the year. The Cardinals are coming here with a team studded with college football stars of 1933. Old timers have been replaced by new men who rapidly are making names for themselves in the professional circuit and the team has been showing constant improvement. Under Coach Paul Schissler, the Cardinals are playing a fast, open game that probably will give the Bays plenty of trouble. In previous years, even while Green Bay was hanging up consecutive championships, they always had plenty of trouble beating the Chicagoans. This year's team, considerably stronger than that of last season, probably will be even tougher to upset...IN GOOD SHAPE: The Packers came out of the game with the Bears Wednesday in good shape. Clark Hinkle, veteran fullback, is the only casualty, but he may be in shape to play Sunday. Buckets Goldenberg, who has been out for a week with an injured knee, will not be in uniform as the injury has not quite healed. Long practice sessions were held by the Packers yesterday and today, with stress laid on formations to stop Chicago's passing attack. The players were disappointed in the defeat at the hands of the Bears, as they believed that they should have beaten the Bruins. They are out to take it out on the Cardinals, and leave home for their swing around the circuit with a record of four wins and two defeats in National league competition. The Cardinals have nine backfield stars available, and a line that averages well over 200 pounds. Among the backs are Paul Pardonner, of Purdue, whose great dropkicking won him considerable acclaim in the Big Ten last year; Tommy Murphy of Arkansas; Frank Greene, Tulsa; Homer Griffith, of Southern California, and Hubert Hinchman, Butler ace...HORSTMANN ON TEAM: Others in the Cardinal backfield are Roy Horstmann, one of the best blockers in the Big Ten last year when with Purdue; Russell Douglas, Kansas State; Howard Tipton, Southern California; Dave Cook, Illinois, and the outstanding fullback of the 1933 collegiate season, Iron Mike Mikulak, Oregon. On the line the Cardinals have four capable ends; some of the strongest tackles in the National league; four guards and three center. The veteran Frank McNally is getting the call for most of the work at center and has demonstrated that he has lost none of the ability that made him an all-American pro performer last year. Bernard Hughes, Oregon, and Paul Shenefelt, Mount Morris, are reserve pivot men who have shown promise. Lou Gordon, on the all-American first team while at Illinois, is one of the veteran tackles of the Cardinals who has always played great ball against the Bays. The Packers plan to open up with nearly everything they have at the outset as they realize they must get the jump on the Chicagoans to win out. Although beaten by the Bears and Detroit, the Cardinals have a team that is capable of giving the Packers plenty of opposition...COACH LAMBEAU WORRIED: Coach E.L. Lambeau views the game with no little concern, believing the Cardinals have the material for one of the finest teams in the league, with lack of experience its only drawback. "The Cardinal management has spent more money than any team in the circuit to secure college aces of 1933 for its lineup," the coach said. "The club has power, speed and a versatile attack. New men are quickly gaining experience and the club is sure to be at its best tomorrow. Our scouts report that the Cardinal backfield ranks with any in the circuit. The line has plenty of power and the Packers will have a hard time gaining through it. The game should be one of the best of the year as the Cardinals realize they must win to stay in the championship picture. We also realize that unless we can upset the Cardinals we will have little chance to stay in the running and our men are ready for a real battle." The Cardinal team will arrive tonight at 8:25 over the Chicago and Northwestern road and depart Monday morning at 10 on the same road.
CINCINNATI IS GIVEN PERMIT TO SELL CLUB
OCT 20 (Cincinnati) - The way was opened today for the sale of the Cincinnati franchise in the NFL at some future date, according to Myron Greentree, general manager of the Cincinnati club. Greentree and Chili Walsh of St. Louis, who was understood to be interested in purchasing the franchise, conferred with Joe F. Carr, league president, yesterday. Carr approved the possible sale, Greentree said. However, Greentree announced the club would not be sold unless it lose money on later home games this season. Several months ago the Cincinnati club asked permission to sell its franchise to St. Louis interest but league officials refused on the ground that traveling expenses would make it almost impossible for eastern teams to play in St. Louis.
BEARS AND TIGERS HAVE BEST RECORDS IN LEAGUE GAMES
OCT 20 (New York) - The Chicago Bears and the Detroit Tigers, only undefeated teams in the NFL, still have the best records in the league, offensively and defensively, respectively. The Bears have now scored 114 points against their opponents' 20, while the Tigers have scored 52 points and are unscored upon. The Packers boosted their scoring points with their 41 to 0 win over Cincinnati, and how have counted 90 points for the second best offensive record in the league while their opponents have scored 39. Pittsburgh and Cincinnati are racing for the cellar position with Pittsburgh having scored 34 points and having 112 chalked up against it and Cincinnati having scored only three points and having an even hundred marked up against it.
FIVE GAMES SUNDAY
OCT 20 (New York) - Only one intersectional game is listed among the five contests scheduled in the NFL Sunday. The Brooklyn Dodgers will travel to Detroit for the only clash between a western and eastern division club as sectional rivals in their own districts. The Packers and Cardinals collide in Green Bay for the honor of staying in the race for the western division laurels, while the Chicago Bears will be seeking their sixth consecutive win of the season against in Cincinnati in Chicago. The New York Giants oppose the Pittsburgh Pirates in New York seeking to maintain their berth at the top of the Eastern race, while Boston plays its second game of the week in facing the Philadelphia Eagles in Boston. With all five clubs of the eastern division having lost at least two games, not a single team is counted out of the race yet. The Pirates held the Giants to a 14 to 12 score in their first meeting, but the Boston game is the first meeting of the season between Swede Hanson and Cliff Battles, two of the league's leading ball carriers.
PRO GRID NOTES
OCT 20 (Green Bay) - Chuck Malone, from down Texas way, is playing brilliant ball at a terminal for the Boston Redskins. Malone was once the property of the Chicago Bears and he played a year at St. Louis before joining Dietz and Co...Brooklyn has picked up a good looking end via the dollar and cents route from the Bears in Wayland Becker, former Marquette star. Becker is a first class punter, receives passes well and is a good open field tackler...The call of the professional gridiron is still heard by Verne Lewellen, halfback and sensational punter for Green Bay's three national championship teams. Lewellen does the announcing over station WHBY at the Packer field...Lou Gordon is one of the Chicago Cardinals veterans who survived the early season house cleaning and the veteran has been going so good at tackle that Coach Paul Schissler has named the ex-Illini as field captain...Swede Ellstrom, a fullback from Oklahoma university, and Arny Arenz, St. Louis backfield men, have been given the pink ticket by Boston. Coach Dietz has a flock of stellar backfielders and the two recruits lacked the veterans' class...Knuckles Boyle, the Coaldale coach miner who got a lot of ink when he signed with the New York Giants, has returned to Pennsylvania. Boyle tried plenty hard enough but Coach Steve Owen couldn't smooth off the rough spots...Ben Smith, once the toast of Georgia, is getting a lot of bouquets thrown his way by the Pittsburgh sport scribes of his play at end for the Pirates. Smith is fast for a big fellow and knows just how to take a tackle out.
​PACKERS PLAY CARDS IN LAST HOME GAME
OCT 21 (Green Bay) - The Packers will make their last home stand Sunday with the flashy Chicago Cardinals as the opposition. With this game out of the way, Green Bay will hit the road, returning to Wisconsin for only one more game at Milwaukee November 18, with the Cardinals again as the opposing team. Spectators at Sunday's game will see in action two of the greatest stars of last year's intercollegiate season, Joe Laws of Iowa and Mike Mikulak of Oregon. Iron Mike, they call the Pacific Coast product, and he is one of the hardest running backs in the pro game. The Cards have been shaken up since last season and, with even a green team, have broken even in the pro league so far. They have Homer Griffiths of Southern California, Roy Horstmann and Paul Pardonner of Purdue and Dave Cook of Illinois in the backfield squad with Mikulak. Pardonner is a new rival for Jack Manders of the Bears as the outstanding field goal kicker of the league. Since last Wednesday night's Bear game in Milwaukee was only an exhibition, the Packers are still nursing a slim chance to overtake the Bears and the Detroit Lions for the western division lead. The Cards can displace the Bays in third place by winning Sunday. None of the other games Sunday loom up with any importance. The lowly Philadelphia club plays at Boston and Cincinnati, tail end club in the western division, plays the Bears in Chicago. Brooklyn is at Detroit and Pittsburgh at New York.
EXHIBITION - Chicago Bears 10, Green Bay Packers 6
Wednesday October 17th 1934 (at Milwaukee)
BUTLER, GREEN BAY CENTER, RETIRES TO ACCEPT GOVERNMENT POST
OCT 19 (Milwaukee Sentinel - Stoney McGlynn) - Frank Butler, the big rookie center of the Green Bay Packers, has accepted a position with the federal government as a levee engineer and has resigned from the Bay fold, it was learned yesterday. It is understood that Butler offered to play Sunday games with the Bays, but when Coach Lambeau informed him that he'd have to practice with the rest of the boys he quit the club in order to accept the government position. The big fella was just coming into his own in the pro league, and, no doubt, would have had a brilliant career with the Bays, but showed he has some gray matter outside of football knowledge when he accepted the permanent position rather than the temporary glory of the gridiron...A friend, who recently got quite a kick out of our contemporary's explanations of what the high schools were doing with the pro pass, came along yesterday with some