NAME             NO   POS  HGT WGT         COLLEGE YR PR  A  G HOW ACQUIRED
Nate Barragar    31     C 6- 0 210             USC  4  5    11
Hank Bruder      27     B 6- 0 190    Northwestern  5  5 27 10
Frank Butler     48     C 6- 3 246     Michigan St  2  2 26  6
Tiny Engebretsen 34     G 6- 1 235    Northwestern  2  4 25  9
Lon Evans        46     G 6- 2 219             TCU  3  3 23 12
Milt Gantenbein  22     E 6- 0 193       Wisconsin  5  5 25 12
B. Goldenberg    44     B 5-10 215       Wisconsin  3  3 24 12
Roger Grove      11     B 6- 0 184     Michigan St  5  5 27  
Arnie Herber     38     B 5-11 203           Regis  6  6 25 11
Clarke Hinkle    30    FB 5-11 205        Bucknell  4  4 26  9
Cal Hubbard      51   T-E 6- 5 265          Geneva  6  8 34 11
Don Hutson       14     E 6- 1 189         Alabama  1  1 22 10
Swede Johnston   15     B 5-10 200       Marquette  4  3 25 11
Walt Kiesling    49     G 6- 3 260 St. Thomas (MN) 10  1 32 10
Joe Laws         29     B 5- 9 185            Iowa  2  2 24 12
Buster Maddox    28     T 6- 3 240       Kansas St  1  1 23  1
Dustin McDonald  42     G 5- 4 202         Indiana  1  1 26  1
NAME             NO   POS  HGT WGT         COLLEGE YR PR  A  G HOW ACQUIRED
*-Johnny McNally 26     B 6- 0 190      St. John's 11  6 31 10
Mike Michalske   33     G 6- 1 200      Penn State  9  7 32 10
Bob Monnett    3/12     B 5- 9 181     Michigan St  5  5 25 11
Bob O'Connor     24     G 6- 1 220        Stanford  1  1 25  7
Claude Perry     32     T 6- 1 211         Alabama  9  9 33  8
Al Rose          47     E 6- 3 195           Texas  6  4 28 12
George Sauer     25     B 6- 2 204        Nebraska  1  1 24 10
Herm Schneidman   4     B 5-10 205            Iowa  1  1 21 11
Ade Schwammel 33/50     T 6- 2 230       Oregon St  2  2 26 11
Champ Seibold    37     G 6- 4 240       Wisconsin  2  2 22  6
Ernie Smith      45     T 6- 2 234             USC  1  1 25 12
George Svendsen  43     C 6- 4 214       Minnesota  1  1 22 11
Bob Tenner       36     E 6- 0 212       Minnesota  1  1 22 11
Dominic Vairo    35     E 6- 2 203      Notre Dame  1  1 22  1
* - Known as Johnny Blood
YR - Years with Packers PR - Years of Professional Football A-Age G - Games  Played
1935 Stock Certificate
$5,000 - Verdict awarded to fan who fell from stands at City Stadium in 1934 and sued team. Packers’ public-liability mutual insurance company was already going bankrupt, so team forced to pay $2,500 to company’s creditors. Fan’s fall sent Packers into receivership.
$15,000 - New capital generated by Lee Joannes’ 1935 stock drive, the second in team history.
(SOURCE: Packer Media Guide)
1935 IN REVIEW
The Packers signed Don Hutson out of Alabama, giving the Packers one of the most feared receivers in NFL history. In a highly competitive Western Division the Packers post an 8-4 record, finishing 2nd among 4 teams with winning records. The Packers also held another stock sale, which raised $15,000 after the corporation had gone into receivership. At that point, the nonprofit Green Bay Football Corporation was reorganized as the Green Bay Packers, Inc., the present company, with 300 shares of stock outstanding.
DON HUSTON: A BROOKLYN DODGER?
After Don Hutson caught six passes for 164 yards to help Alabama upset Stanford in the Rose Bowl 29-13, Don Hutson was a hot commodity. At the time, there was no NFL Draft which meant Hutson was free to negotiate with whatever team he wanted. “The Bears offered me $75 a game. I remember that George Halas wrote me a two-page letter about what a privilege it was to play for the Bears.” Eventually, the bidding narrowed down to the Brooklyn Dodgers and the Packers. Hutson signed contracts with both but the Green Bay contract arrived in league headquarters first. “They gave me $300 a game,” says Hutson, “so for 11 games that means I got $3,300. Nobody in Green Bay had ever been paid that much. Finally, at the end, when I had been all-pro for nine years in a row, I was up to $15,000 a year.” Had it not been for a unique decision by NFL President Joe Carr, Hutson might have become a Dodger. Carr ruled the contract with the earliest postmark would be honored. The Packers' contract was postmarked 8:30 a.m., 17 minutes earlier than the Dodgers' pact. Thus Hutson became a Packer. His first touchdown came on an 83-yard pass from Arnie Herber in just his second game as a Packer. He wound up with 99 career touchdown receptions, a record that stood for more than four decades. When Hutson retired in 1945 after 11 superb seasons, he held 18 NFL records, including 488 career receptions. That was 200 more than his closest competitor. Hutson invented modern pass receiving. He created Z-outs, buttonhooks, hook-and-gos, and a whole catalog of moves and fakes. Hutson was a 60-minute player who spent most of his career as a very fine safety on defense. In his final six seasons, he swiped 30 opposing quarterbacks’ passes. SOURCE: NFL Hall of Fame Website
1935 PRE-SEASON RESULTS (4-0)
AUGUST (1-0)
31 at Merrill Fromm Foxes                W 34- 0    1-0-0    1,500 
SEPTEMBER (3-0)
2  at Chippewa Falls Marines             W 22- 0    2-0-0    6,000
4  at Stevens Point                      W 40- 0    3-0-0    1,500
8  G-LA CROSSE OLD STYLE LAGERS          W 49- 0    4-0-0    2,500
1935 RESULTS (8-4)
SEPTEMBER (2-1)
15 G-CHICAGO CARDINALS (0-0-0)           L  6- 7    0-1-0   10,000
22 G-CHICAGO BEARS (0-0-0)               W  7- 0    1-1-0   13,600
29 G-NEW YORK GIANTS (1-1-0)             W 16- 7    2-1-0   10,000
OCTOBER (3-1)
6  G-PITTSBURGH PIRATES (1-2-0)          W 27- 0    3-1-0    5,000
13 M-CHICAGO CARDINALS (1-0-1)           L  0- 3    3-2-0   13,000
20 M-DETROIT LIONS (2-1-1)               W 13- 9    4-2-0    9,500
27 at Chicago Bears (3-1-1)              W 17-14    5-2-0   29,386
NOVEMBER (2-2)
10 G-DETROIT LIONS (4-2-1)               W 31- 7    6-2-0   12,000
17 at Detroit Lions (4-3-1)              L 10-20    6-3-0   12,500
24 at Pittsburgh Pirates (4-5-0)         W 34-14    7-3-0   12,902
28 at Chicago Cardinals (5-3-1)          L  7- 9    7-4-0    7,500
DECEMBER (1-0)
8  at Philadelphia Eagles (2-8-0)        W 13- 6    8-4-0    4,000
G - Green Bay M - Milwaukee
These days, the average NFL player receives about $1.2 million a year, not a bad paycheck for throwing around the old pigskin. After all, that’s three times what the President makes (though he does get free limo rides), and plenty more than your average blogger does (sigh). But in 1935, playing football wasn’t the glitzy well-funded enterprise it is today. That’s the year the Green Bay Packers went looking for a center, and found future President Gerald Ford. They offered President Ford $110 bucks a game. Over the course of a season—14 games—that means Ford would’ve squirreled away $1,540, about $24,000 bucks in 2011 dollars, if he had accepted the draft deal. Ford declined this offer, and another offer from the Detroit Lions to play professional football, and instead made his way over into Yale to study law, then to the Navy to serve his country, then to the House of Representatives, and finally to the White House where, thankfully, the salary was a bit better.Packers versus Cardinals in Milwaukee (SOURCE: The National Archives Blog)