Chicago Bears (1-5) 28, Green Bay Packers (4-2) 24
Sunday November 4th 1945 (at Chicago)
GAME RECAP (MILWAUKEE JOURNAL)
(CHICAGO) - All of Green Bay's high hopes went just like this Sunday afternoon: Kerplunk. The Bears did it. Two to one underdogs after five straight defeats, they unceremoniously battered the Packers all over Wrigley field, while a capacity crowd of 45,527 howled, and
just as unceremoniously knocked them down into third 
place in the western end of the league. The score was 28-
24. Whether Curly Lambeau will ever be able to collect all
the pieces remains to be seen, but this much was certain
today - only pieces remained. The Bears did a complete job
despite the respectability of the score. They scattered 
Packers right and left with their explosive running game,
passed as they used to in their happiest days, and handed
out physical punishment, good, hard punishment, such as
the Packers have seldom had to take before.
PACKERS LEAD 14-0
The punishment, in fact, the accumulated punishment, was
as much a factor in the game as anything else. The 
Packers jumped off to a 14-0 lead in the first six minutes of
play. They almost pranced with the fire they carried into the
game. But then under the constant pounding of a savagely
charging Bear line they started to wilt, gamely protected
their lead for awhile, but wilted some more, and in the later
stages were as bedraggled and as thoroughly beaten as
they have been in some time - and again despite the
respectability of the score. It looked like a Packer waltz in
the first six minutes of play. Clyde Goodnight took a 40 yard
pass from Irv Comp and ran 27 more for a touchdown while
the strains of the Star Spangled Banner still hung over the
field, and Comp, a couple of minutes later, intercepted a
pass and ran 54 yards for another. It was an encouraging
start for Green Bay, a discouraging one for the Bears -
except that the Bears refused to remain discouraged. They
waited until the second quarter to recover from these early
blows, then hit a pace the Packers could not match. While
Larry Craig added another touchdown and Ted Fritsch a 49
yard field goal to the Packer total in the second quarter, the
Bears rolled up four touchdowns - two by Henry Margarita
and one by Ken Kavanaugh in the blazing second quarter,
and one by Jim Fordham in the third.
BALL BOUNCES RIGHT
A ball which bounced right helped the Packers look as good
as they did - on the board. Goodnight's touchdown was
scored after Hugh Gallarneau had deflected Comp's pass
trying to bat it down. Comp's touchdown was scored after a
pass had bounced out of Margarita's hands. And Craig's
touchdown, the first, incidentally, of his pro career, was
scored after Margarita had fumbled and the ball had
bounced into the clear. It was good, alert football, but it was
made possible, too, only because the gods smiled. Against
this kind of scoring, the Bears, on the other hand, 
proceeded sharply and surely and strictly on their own.
Margarita scored his first touchdown from the two yard line
after a march of 53 yards, and his second from the eight
yard line after a march of 66. Kavanaugh got his tally in the
last two seconds of the half on a 15 yard pass from Sid
Luckman after a march of 68 yards, and Fordham hung up
his after a parade of 71. The statistics tell better than words
what superiority the Bears really held. Chicago got 406
yards on this bitter afternoon, 269 of them rushing; Green
Bay got 182, only 31 of them rushing. Chicago completed
eight out of 15 passes; Green Bay, eight out of 22. Chicago
piled up 19 first downs, 12 of them rushing; Green Bay,
nine, only three of them rushing. And yet, despite this
superiority, the Packers, thanks to the happy bounces of
the ball and alertness, remained in the game down to the
final gun. In fact, as the hands of the big clock started on
their last trip around the dial, Green Bay, in one last mighty
effort, had moved 48 yards to Chicago's 32 yard line, first
down. But that is where they stopped, too. They had given
everything they had. They were spent.
LONG CASUALTY LIST
The bruising nature of the game was reflected in the 
casualty list. Comp was kicked in the head and twisted his
ankle, both early in the third quarter, and never returned.
McKay came out of the game with a broken nose and a 
bruised knee. Goldenberg went out of the game for keeps
with a bad knee. Baby Ray had a badly cut lip. And Pete
Tinsley and Clyde Goodnight were kicked out of the game
for rough play - but they had merely tried to hold their own.
It was a bruising a battle as the Bears and Packers have
played in a long, long time. As a result of the licking, the
Packers dropped into third place in the western division of
the race - a full game behind the Rams and Lions, both of
whom won and who remained tied for the lead. There was
little consolation for the Packers Sunday night except that
they play both in return games - the Rams at Cleveland 
next Sunday.
GOODNIGHT SCORES ON PASS
The Packers scored their first touchdown in the first two
minutes and 20 seconds and on five plays after Comp had
returned the kickoff 15 yards to his own 16. A third down pass, Comp to Luhn, picked up a first down on the 33 and a second down pass from there, a long one, Comp to Goodnight, brought the ball home. The catch was something to bring the crowd roaring to its feet - and a portent of the kind of a game this was to be. Gallarneau, covering Goodnight, inadvertently tapped the ball in the air as he tried to bat it down, and Goodnight, lunging to catch it, easily ran the last 24 yards alone. The Packers wasted no time to build up their lead, either. They kicked off, yielded a first down in midfield, and then turned Ronzani's pass intended for Margarita into another touchdown. The ball, thrown as though shot out of a cannon, bounced out of Margarita's hands into Comp's - and that was that. Comp streaked 54 yards down the east sidelines, without a hand to detain him. Hutson's kick made it 14-0.
MARGARITA GOES OVER
It remained 14-0 through the rest of the quarter but early in the second, the Bears set their own scoring wheels in motion. They started on their own 47 after a punt, and on three first downs achieved through passing and running both, reached Green Bay's seven. It took only two plays from here. Fordham rammed over right tackle for five and Margarita ploughed over center for the touchdown. Gudauskas converted. The Packers snapped right back, however. They returned the kickoff to their own 42, picked up a first down on Chicago's 42 on Fritsch's 16 yard run and rested their case on Fritsch's toe. And Fritsch did not fail. With Laws holding the ball on Chicago's 49, he booted the placement which just sailed over the bar. Incidentally, the league record for a field goal is held by Glen Presnell - 53 yards. In the slam bang affair that this had become, though, it again became Chicago's turn. The Bears took the kickoff on their own 34 and immediately paraded down the field. Gallarneau picked up a first down on Green Bay's 40, spinning around end; Fordham rammed down to the 15; Margarita added three, Fordham four, and Margarita then slammed over left tackle for the last eight yards. There was doubt about the touchdown play. The Bears were obviously in motion and obviously offside, yet the officials did not call either, and the touchdown stood. Gudauskas' kick again was good.
CRAIG PICKS UP FUMBLE
The Packers got the touchdown back in less than two minutes, however. They received the kickoff, lost the ball on a long pass which Grygo intercepted on the Bears 18 - and then scored. Margarita fumbled on first down and Craig, picking up the loose ball in the flat, ran with a clear field ahead. Hutson's kick put the Packers in front, 24-14. But once more the Bears came back - this time on a march of 88 yards. They took the kickoff on their own 12, picked up four first downs to Green Bay's 24, and then, with two seconds of the half left, scored on a brilliantly executed pass, Luckman to Kavanaugh. Kavanaugh eluded Hutson under the goal posts, leaped up into the air and pulled in the ball. Gudauskas' kick left it, 24-21, at the half. The period ended on the next kickoff.
BEARS KEEP ROLLING
And with the resumption of play, the Bears picked up right where they had left off. They returned the kickoff to their own 29, and on four first downs, with Grygo, McLean, Fordham and Famiglietti ripping the Packer line apart and Luckman pitching a couple of strikes, they roared to Green Bay's one. On first down here, Luckman was stopped on a quarterback sneak, but on second, Fordham tore over right guard for the touchdown. Gudauskas converted, and the Packers trailed, 28-24. And that is where the Packers remained the rest of the game. They threatened in the closing minutes, going from their own 20 to Chicago's 32 on three straight first downs. With 50 seconds left, however, they could go no farther. Brock lost five yards on an attempted pass, then fumbled the ball on the next down and time expired as the two teams scrambled for the ball.
GREEN BAY - 14 10  0  0 - 24
CHI BEARS -  0 21  7  0 - 28
1st - GB - Goodnight, 67-yard pass from Comp (Hutson kick) GREEN BAY 7-0
1st - GB - Comp, 54-yard interception return (Hutson kick) GREEN BAY 14-0
2nd - CHI - Bob Margarita, 2-yard run (Pete Gudauskas kick) GREEN BAY 14-7
2nd - GB - Craig, 18-yard fumble return (Hutson kick) GREEN BAY 21-7
2nd - CHI - Margarita, 7-yard run (Gudauskas kick) GREEN BAY 21-14
2nd - GB - Fritsch, 49-yard field goal GREEN BAY 24-14
2nd - CHI - Ken Kavanaugh, 15-yd pass from Sid Luckman (Gudauskas kick) GB 24-21
3rd - CHI - Jim Fordham, 1-yard run (Gudauskas kick) CHICAGO BEARS 28-24
NEWS AND NOTES
SUPERIOR LINES WINS FOR BEARS
NOVEMBER 4 (Chicago Tribune) - The Chicago
Bears' line played like those of their championship
days yesterday against the Green Bay Packers.
Perhaps it even played more courageously, for
seldom has any victorious team had 24 points
scored against it more easily. The Bears were
behind 14 points at the end of the first quarter by
virtue of the Packers' long touchdown pass, Irv 
Comp to Clyde Goodnight, and a second score by
interception of Gene Ronzani's pass. They were
behind 10 points twice in the second period by
addition of a touchdown on Larry Craig's recovery
of Hank Margarita's fumble plus a field goal. The
​Bears' line scarcely could be blamed for these easy
points. It can be praised for outplaying the Packer
forwards. The rushing statistics were: Bears, 281
yards; Packers, 31 yards. Lee Artoe, tackle on the Bears' championship elevens, and center Johnny Schiechi led the Bears' superlative defense and both also were principals in individual battles during the game which saw the Packers' Pete Tinsley and Goodnight sent to the sidelines. Even here, in the final minute, Tinsley got a whack at Schiechi, using his helmet as a weapon. At various times Comp and Roy McKay, Packer passers, were stretched on the turf and in the fourth period Bernie Crimmins also was dropped. Apparently this game measured up to requirements for the ancient feud. Last evening the Bears' Jack Morton visited the Illinois Masonic hospital to have a cut under his eye sewed and Artoe were there also. Lee certainly has a battered eye and an X-ray today will determine whether his jaw is broken. The Packers had only 12 plays from scrimmage, including two punts in the first period, when they went to the front, 14 to 0. In the same time the Bears had 23 plays. The Bears' margin in the second quarter, when they sscored three touchdowns, was 27 plays from scrimmage to eight for Green Bay, including kicks and penalties. This demonstrated advantage in number of opportunities eventually aided the Bears' production of the winning touchdown in the third quarter. Their four point margin, just sufficient to eliminate a tie by a Green Bay field goal, was vulnerable to a touchdown and kept the crowd of 45,527 until the final gun. Sid Luckman's record on passing equaled his best work in the heydey of his career. Of the only four passes he failed to complete two were easy shots over center dropped by George Wilson. While Sid was on target, Comp and McKay were erratic possibly because they were accorded indifferent protection. Moreover, the Bears' secondary stopped Don Hutson with aid of Artoe's rushes to harry the throwers.
SECRET LAMBEAU WEDDING LAST JULY ON COAST REVEALED
NOVEMBER 4 (Hollywood) - Grace Nichols, the ex-wife of Gregory Laeava, well known producer-director, has been secretly married since last July 16 to Earl Lambeau, professional football coach with the Green Bay Packers. She took out a marriage license in Santa Monica on July 13 and was wed three days later to the football coach by Judge Thurmond Clarke in Los Angeles. This was her fourth marriage and among her former husbands was millionaire oil tycoon William Garland, Jr., who left $2,000,000 to their daughter, Jane, who is now 12.
BEAR-PACKER BRAWLS SHOULD BRING ACTION
NOVEMBER 6 (Milwaukee Journal) - The time has come that the league well may do something about the Bear-Packer games, for the good of the teams themselves, the good of pro football, and certainly the good of the health of the players on the field. Football ceases to be a game when it produces, because of high feeling and what is platitudinously known as "unnecessary roughness", such a casualty list as last Sunday's. It's one thing to bring a man down with a good, hard tackle or block intended only to be a tackle or block, and perhaps even cause an injury by it, and quite another to bring a man down, and in the act of bringing him down, or pinning him unnecessarily apply a knee or an elbow or a fist. Sunday's game just about set a high for a Packer-Bear game in rough play - unnecessary rough play. That only two men, both Packers, Pete Tinsley and Clyde Goodnight, were ejected was rather remarkable. There certainly would have been others if the officials had called all the infractions apparent from the stands. At any rate, the league might well step in and do something about these games. They are getting worse. The officials can only go so far. A really stiff fine for a palpably willful infraction, instead of the customary $50 fine, might, for one thing, have a salutary effect. There must be other things, too, though, that the league could do - for it's own good, the players' good, the games' good...A STERN CHASE: It now rally becomes a stern chase for the Packers in the western end of the league. A full game behind the Lions and the Rams, who remain tied for first place, the Packers after Sunday's licking now face the toughest kind of going to retain the championship they won a year ago. There is only one real ray of hope. Coming down the stretch, they will have a crack at both of the leaders - the Rams in Cleveland Sunday - and if they can knock them both off, they can jump right into the middle of the fight, again. They must knock off both, though. In fact, they must just about go undefeated through their last four games - Cleveland at Cleveland Sunday, Boston at Boston November 18, New York at New York November 25 and Detroit at Detroit December 2. The incurable optimist, Curly Lambeau, who was completely dejected Sunday night, thinks they can do it. "We can still do it," he said Monday. "Sunday's game is over the dam. We didn't deserve it. We got most of the breaks, and still we lost. The Bears Sunday could have beaten any team they faced. But the rest of the season may be something else. Certainly we'll never face a team as red hot as the Bears were. And maybe now we can become red hot. If this club of ours has anything, and I think it had, it can win its last four games. And that will be enough." The Packers had the day off Monday to nurse their bruises and got only a limbering drill Tuesday...CONDITION DOUBTFUL: The condition of the cripples was Lambeau's chief worry as he started to prepare for the make or break game with the Rams. Every game from here in is make or break. Except for Goldenberg, who got a wicked crack on the knee, the rest of the cripples will probably be recovered sufficiently by Sunday to play. At least Lambeau has offered a fervent prayer that they will be. In poor physical condition, the Packers would have little chance to redeem themselves against the Rams, who already hold a victory over them. Goldenberg hobbled around town Monday in condition that almost preclude any chance of getting into the game. The worst beating Sunday was taken by the two passers, McKay and Comp. Even Cecil Isbell, who knows a little about the punishment a passer must take, made the remark after the game: "I wouldn't take the licking those guys got out there for $10,000." McKay's face was completely battered - by Bears merely trying to keep him from throwing the ball. McKay did not suffer a broken nose as was first feared, however. He only had his face bashed in. A lot Sunday, of course, will depend upon the condition of Comp and McKay. Without their passing, the Packers will have little chance. Lambeau's strongest prayers went up for them.
ISBELL CALLED BEST FORWARD PASSER BY PACKER COACH
NOVEMBER 6 (Chicago) - Coach Earl (Curly) Lambeau of the Green Bay Packers added new fuel to one of football's oldest arguments Monday when he named Cecil Isbell, Purdue head coach, as the game's greatest passer. "Isbell was a master at any range - short, medium or long," Lambeau said. "He could throw soft passes, bullet ones or feathery lobs. He's the best, with Sid Luckman of the Bears a close second and Sammy Baugh a long third." Luckman is just about as good as Isbell, Lambeau said, but not quite as versatile. Baugh does not toss the long ones to compare with Isbell. Isbell quit professional football and the Packers three years ago to become backfield coach at Purdue, where he first rose to stardom. He took over as head coach two years ago. Taking before the Quaterback club here Monday, Lambeau called Sunday's game between the Packers and the Chicago Bears "the roughest we ever played." "The Bears were so keyed up they would have beaten any team in the country," he added. Lambeau said halfback Irv Comp suffered a knee injury and that halfback Roy McKay had his nose broken in the wild and woolly contest, from which Green Bay's Pete Tinsley was banished for punching Chicago's Sid Luckman in the nose.
'BEARS DESERVES THEIR VICTORY'; CURLY LAMBEAU
NOVEMBER 6 (Chicago Tribune) - Curly Lambeau, coach of the champion Green Bay Packers, yesterday verified his team's 28 to 24 loss to the Bears Sunday in Wrigley field. Speaking before the Monday Quarterbacks' meeting in the Morrison hotel, Lambeau said the score didn't tell the whole story of the NFL's top upset of the season. "We got all the breaks of the game," Curly admitted with sportsmanlike candor. "The Bears outfought us, outcharged us, and we got a trimming we rightfully deserved." Don Hutson was prevented from making an appearance by illness. Lambeau shared the speaking spotlight with Cecil Isbell, his one time star passer at Green Bay, now coach at Purdue, Guy Mackey, Purdue's athletic director, and Kenneth L. (Tug) Wilson, Western conference athletic commissioner. "I don't believe the Bears will beat the Lions Sunday," said Lambeau in answering one of many questions asked by the fans. "No team can be at such a peak two consecutive times. We were victims much in the same manner as was Cecil's Purdue team a couple of weeks ago at Northwestern. We ran into a team Sunday which would have beaten any team it faced." Someone sent up a question inquiring about "the Bears' slugging tactics". "We tried to retaliate," said the veteran coach, "and some of our players were thrown out (Pete Tinsley and Clyde Goodnight were the ones ejected). We're not very clever at the sort of stuff." There was the inevitable question concerning Hutson's retirement. "I hope he plays at least two more seasons," Curly answer. "He hasn't slowed up at all. And he has been sincere every time he announced his plans to retire." Lambeau rated Isbell as the greatest passer of all time. He placed the Bears' Sid Luckman second, and the Redskins' Sammy Baugh third.
PACKERS LOSE COMP; MCKAY IS DOUBTFUL
NOVEMBER 7 (Milwaukee Journal) - The Packers, it now appears, might have lost more last Sunday than the Bear game. They might have lost the Ram game this week, too, for they are going to go into it, unless a miracle happens, not only in their worst condition of the gall, but perhaps their worst condition in several falls. At certain spots the Packers, being the kind of team they are, can ill afford to lose any men. Left halfback is one of them. The left halfbacks provide the key to the passing attack. No Packer team has ever gone so far without one, a good one. And now consider the team's plight as it tries to pick itself off the floor and get ready for the Rams. Irv Comp, the No. 1 passer at left halfback, definitely will not play. The playful little tap he got from George Wilson will keep him on the sidelines for at least a week. Roy McKay, the No. 2 passer, probably will not play, or if he does, it will be only a short while. The playful little taps he got from Lee Artoe and George Wilson broke his nose and closed his eyes, among other things. In the absence of the veterans, only two newcomers remain to fill the role - Dave Mosley of Alabama, who has played about the equivalent of 20 minutes in three or four games so far, if that much, and Bruce Smith, who joined the team last week and got into the Bear game for exactly two plays. A nice prospect, indeed. And if Curly Lambeau wearies of thinking about it, he can turn to some of his other cripples still limping around, or to Ted Fritsch, who was taken to a hospital Tuesday with an attack of appendicitis. Fritsch may not have to be operated upon at once, and may play, but even that remains to be seen. A nice prospect all around, indeed - a very, nice prospect.
REDSKIN AFTER HUTSON'S SCALP
NOVEMBER 7 (Chicago) - Steve Bagarus, halfback of the Washington Redskins, is in hot pursuit of Don Hutson's pass receiving championship in the NFL. Bagarus chiseled the great Green Bay end's margin last week end by spearing six passes as the Redskins nosed out the Chicago Cardinals, 24-21. That gave the rookie halfback a season total of 23 receptions, compared with 32 for Hutson, who has only four games left to play while Bagarus has five. Bagarus has Sam Baugh, the league's best passer, throwing passes to him. Hutson, who caught only three passes as the Packers were spilled Sunday by the Chicago Bears, booted three extra points to raise his pace setting total to 78 points. Frank Akins of Washington kept the ground gaining leadership with 391 yards in 81 attempts, 24 yards ahead of little Hank Magarita of the Bears, who wrested second place from Steve Van Buren of Philadelphia with 367 yards in 70 tries. Margarita skipped 116 yards against Green Bay. Baugh maintained the passing lead with a sizzling .705 percentage on 80 completions in 113 tosses. Sid Tinsley of Pittsburgh tops the league punters with a 41 yard average on 35 kicks.
RAMS HOPE FOR 2ND VICTORY OVER PACKERS
NOVEMBER 10 (Cleveland) - The Walsh brothers' hard-hitting Rams hope to put the Green Bay Packers, 1944 champions, out of this year's pennant picture in the NFL race here tomorrow afternoon.The game will be played at the Cleveland Indians baseball lot, which seats about 35,000, and there is every indication of a full house, according to reports from the Rams' counting room, where tickets have been selling like hot cakes for several weeks. Gridiron hostilities will start at 2 p.m. (1 o'clock Wisconsin time). The Rams got home from their "break even" Eastern trip in good physical shape and all hands will be available for the crucial fracas with Lambeau's Bays. The Clevelanders whipped the Badger team on the home field in Packertown 27 to 14 several weeks ago and the players feel confident of being able to make it two in a row. The Packers arrived here by plane Friday afternoon and Coach Lambeau has worked his squad twice at the park to get the lay of the land while studying the air currents which blow off Lake Erie. Lambeau intends to shoot the works against the Rams and it is understood that Bruce Smith, former Minnesota All-America backfielder, is going to see a lot of action against Cleveland. Bruce has been with the Bays for a couple of weeks and it is understood that he is now ready to cut loose with some of his fancy ball carrying capers which made him famous with the Gophers.
PACKERS MAY FLY TO BATTLE; ALL CRIPPLES MAKE TRIP
NOVEMBER 9 (Milwaukee Journal) - Still carrying mementos from their bruising battle with the Bears last Sunday, Curly Lambeau's Green Bay Packers arrived in Milwaukee Friday morning on the first leg of their trip to Cleveland, where Sunday where they will meet the Cleveland Rams in the battle which will make or break them as contenders down the home stretch of the National league race. The team arrived by train, then continued on to Cleveland in two PCA planes. A workout was scheduled in Cleveland Friday afternoon. All the men more seriously injured in last Sunday's game, including Irv Comp, Roy McKay and Buckets Goldenberg, were in the traveling party, but how much action they might see was doubtful. "We took Comp along only because of his passing," Lambeau said. "He definitely cannot run, and we'll be telegraphing our intentions every time we out him into the game. But that will be better than no passing at all. McKay may be able to run a bit, but not much, and here, too, we'll be telegraphing pretty much what we intend to do, with him in the game. Fritsch got out of the hospital Thursday afternoon and did some running, nothing more, to loosen up. He was a bit weak after his attack of appendicitis, but should be ready Sunday. Goldenberg we'll use only in spots on defense. His leg still bothers him and we don't dare use him on offense on which he might be called to pull out of the line. We're really in bad shape and that's the truth." The only bright spots, according to Lambeau, were the improvement in Bruce Smith and Dave Mosley both during the week. Between them they will carry most of the load at left half. Smith especially has started to fit in nicely. Out of Cleveland, meanwhile, came a report of a demand for tickets unprecedented in the history of the Rams. The baseball park, where the game will be played, was sold out two weeks ago, and 6,000 temporary seats were all gone Tuesday. Cleveland's team in the All-American conference has the municipal stadium tied up and it was impossible for the Rams to get it. Indications were that if the Rams, currently in first place in the western division, could have got it, a crowd of some 75,000 would have seen Sunday's engagement. Sunday's game will start at 1 o'clock, Milwaukee time, and not 1:30 as previously announced. The Packers will set up headquarters at the Cleveland hotel and will return to Milwaukee by plane immediately after the game, arriving here at 7:30 Sunday evening before continuing the trip home.
RAMS HOPE FOR 2ND VICTORY OVER PACKERS
NOVEMBER 10 (Cleveland) - The Walsh brothers' hard-hitting Rams hope to put the Green Bay Packers, 1944 champions, out of this year's pennant picture in the NFL race here tomorrow afternoon.The game will be played at the Cleveland Indians baseball lot, which seats about 35,000, and there is every indication of a full house, according to reports from the Rams' counting room, where tickets have been selling like hot cakes for several weeks. Gridiron hostilities will start at 2 p.m. (1 o'clock Wisconsin time). The Rams got home from their "break even" Eastern trip in good physical shape and all hands will be available for the crucial fracas with Lambeau's Bays. The Clevelanders whipped the Badger team on the home field in Packertown 27 to 14 several weeks ago and the players feel confident of being able to make it two in a row. The Packers arrived here by plane Friday afternoon and Coach Lambeau has worked his squad twice at the park to get the lay of the land while studying the air currents which blow off Lake Erie. Lambeau intends to shoot the works against the Rams and it is understood that Bruce Smith, former Minnesota All-America backfielder, is going to see a lot of action against Cleveland. Bruce has been with the Bays for a couple of weeks and it is understood that he is now ready to cut loose with some of his fancy ball carrying capers which made him famous with the Gophers.
PACKERS MAY FLY TO BATTLE; ALL CRIPPLES MAKE TRIP
NOVEMBER 9 (Milwaukee Journal) - Still carrying mementos from their bruising battle with the Bears last Sunday, Curly Lambeau's Green Bay Packers arrived in Milwaukee Friday morning on the first leg of their trip to Cleveland, where Sunday where they will meet the Cleveland Rams in the battle which will make or break them as contenders down the home stretch of the National league race. The team arrived by train, then continued on to Cleveland in two PCA planes. A workout was scheduled in Cleveland Friday afternoon. All the men more seriously injured in last Sunday's game, including Irv Comp, Roy McKay and Buckets Goldenberg, were in the traveling party, but how much action they might see was doubtful. "We took Comp along only because of his passing," Lambeau said. "He definitely cannot run, and we'll be telegraphing our intentions every time we out him into the game. But that will be better than no passing at all. McKay may be able to run a bit, but not much, and here, too, we'll be telegraphing pretty much what we intend to do, with him in the game. Fritsch got out of the hospital Thursday afternoon and did some running, nothing more, to loosen up. He was a bit weak after his attack of appendicitis, but should be ready Sunday. Goldenberg we'll use only in spots on defense. His leg still bothers him and we don't dare use him on offense on which he might be called to pull out of the line. We're really in bad shape and that's the truth." The only bright spots, according to Lambeau, were the improvement in Bruce Smith and Dave Mosley both during the week. Between them they will carry most of the load at left half. Smith especially has started to fit in nicely. Out of Cleveland, meanwhile, came a report of a demand for tickets unprecedented in the history of the Rams. The baseball park, where the game will be played, was sold out two weeks ago, and 6,000 temporary seats were all gone Tuesday. Cleveland's team in the All-American conference has the municipal stadium tied up and it was impossible for the Rams to get it. Indications were that if the Rams, currently in first place in the western division, could have got it, a crowd of some 75,000 would have seen Sunday's engagement. Sunday's game will start at 1 o'clock, Milwaukee time, and not 1:30 as previously announced. The Packers will set up headquarters at the Cleveland hotel and will return to Milwaukee by plane immediately after the game, arriving here at 7:30 Sunday evening before continuing the trip home.
RAMS ARE FAVORED TO BEAT GREEN BAY
NOVEMBER 11 (Cleveland) - Curly Lambeau's crippled Packers, tottering on the brink of elimination in the western division of the pro league, meet their old conquerors, the Cleveland Rams, here Sunday afternoon in a game which, flatly, they must win to remain in the race. A victory, and the Men of the Bay will be back in the thick of the fight, tied with the Rams, who at the moment share first place with Detroit. A licking, and they will be two games off the pace with only three to go - and only the rankest of outside chances to repeat for the title they won a year ago. The game has stirred pro fans here as few others ever have, and a capacity crowd of 29,000 will be packed in League park at the kickoff. All regular seats were sold shortly after the Rams scored their first victory over Green Bay a month ago, and 6,000 temporary seats were gobbled up in a few hours early this week. The town has gone just a little batty over the Rams in their first real title bid. Cleveland ruled a solid seven point favorite. Not only did the Rams score a rather decisive victory in the first game, 27-14, but the Packers flew into town Friday into their worst condition of the fall. They still carries mementos of their game last week with the Bears. Irv Comp and Roy McKay, the two best passers, and Buckets Goldenberg all hobbled around and Ted Fritsch, who left a hospital bed in Green Bay to be with the team after an attack of appendicitis, looked slightly drawn. Lambeau wasn't at all hopeful. "We've got one of the toughest games of the season right in front of us and we're in our worst shape," he said. "At full strength I think we could beat the Rams no matter what happened in that first game. After all, we had that one sewed up, 14-6, in the fourth quarter, then fell apart. And we're 'up' for this one after what happened last week. We're in a swell spot. But our condition - I don't know." Whatever the condition of the Packers, however, the Rams refuse to be lulled into any feeling that they have the victory in their hip pocket. They regard it as the crux of their season, and they were ready Saturday night for an all-out performance. In view of the doubtful condition of Comp and McKay, the Packers will probably rely largely on their running game Sunday, which at times has looked good, but more often has looked bad. Against the Bears, the Packers gained only 31 yards rushing. Don Hutson will probably be more of a decoy Sunday than ever before unless one of the new left halfbacks, Bruce Smith or Dave Mosley, suddenly finds more accuracy in passing than they have shown so far. The Rams came out of their victory over New York last week in perfect condition. They will take the field at full strength, led by the veteran Bob Waterfield at quarterback in the T as Coach Adam Walsh plays it. The Rams have never defeated Green Bay in Cleveland. A year ago they took a 42-7 trouncing which still rankles. Sunday's game here will be one of another full round. In others, the Detroit Lions will go out against the Bears in Chicago, the New York Giants will face Philadelphia at Philadelphia, the Chicago Cardinal will meet Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh, and the Boston Yankees will go to Washington to try to duplicate an earlier victory over the Redskins. The Bears, Steelers, and Redskins all were favored to win.