Pittsburgh Steelers (3-4) 38, Green Bay Packers (3-5) 7
Sunday November 7th 1948 (at Pittsburgh)
GAME RECAP (MILWAUKEE JOURNAL)
(PITTSBURGH) - Look out below - here comes Green Bay. Curly Lambeau's once proud Packers, the team the whole National league respected and feared, reached their season's low here Sunday afternoon as they bowed to the Pittsburgh Steelers, 38-7. Some 26,058 
fans saw it, and they rubbed their eyes in amazement as
their own heroes, bounced around no little themselves 
this fall, ran, passed and fought the Packers into
humiliating submission. It wasn't even a contest as
Pittsburgh piled up seven points in the first quarter, 17 in
the second, seven in the third and seven more in the
fourth. Green Bay got its consolation touchdown only
after the hand on the big clock had started its last trip
around the dial.
EVANS A STANDOUT
Appropriately enough, on an afternoon like this, and
against a team that obviously had no appetite for football,
the Steelers scored in a variety of ways. Ray Evans, the
outstanding man on the field and the workhorse in the
absence of the injured Johnny Clement, passed seven
yards to Val Jansante for the first touchdown. Jerry
Shipkey bucked over from the one yard line for the
second. Evans ran 14 yards around left end for the third.
Joe Glamp broke over right tackle, reversed his field and
ran 56 for the fourth. Joe Compagno intercepted one of
Jacobs' passes and ran 82 yards for the fifth. And Glamp
who also kicked all extra point, kicked a 33 yard field 
goal. The Packers scored on a 19 yard pass, Jug Girard
to Clyde Goodnight. Ted Fritsch kicked the extra point.
So completely did the Steelers dominate the play at 
least until they had the game safely stowed away, that
Green Bay never even had position to score until late in
the game. In the first quarter, the Packers never got
beyond the 50 yard line; in the second, never beyond
Pittsburgh's 37, and in the third, never beyond the
Steelers' 25. Twice in the second half, the futility of their
play reached a new high for the season when each time
on a sequence of three plays, they suffered tremendous
losses. On the first of these, with the ball on Pittsburgh's
48, Comp lost four, Canadeo lost six and Comp lost 14
before they finally kicked. On the second, with the ball
on their own 20, Moss lost eight, Earhart two and Comp
nine, before they finally kicked again. It was just 
hopeless football.
SECOND STEELER VICTORY
The victory was Pittsburgh's second over Green Bay in
league history. Green Bay has won 12 games. It also
atoned for a licking the Steelers suffered in an exhibition
at Green Bay early in the season. As the Packers played
Sunday the Chicago Bears next week may well set 
something of a league scoring record - that is, if the 
Bears want to be cruel and pout it on. The Packers have
reached a state of disintegration as a football team. 
Perhaps the highlight here Sunday aside from Evans'
play, was provided by a fan near the end of the game.
Mr. Fan, in his hilarity, took a kickoff which had sailed
into the end zone and dashed some 60 yards with
gendarmes in pursuit. The gendarmes closed in on him
but Mr. Fan had a trick up his sleeve. He lateraled the
ball into the stands. At a late hour Sunday night, 
Lambeau with a contract all made out, was still hunting
for the guy. Mr. Fan might help at that.
STEELERS BLOCK PUNT
The Steelers wasted no time to show their intentions on
this afternoon. They blocked Jacobs' punt in the early
minutes, Seabright recovering on Green Bay's 48 and
immediately marched down the field for the first of their
three touchdown in the first half. On three first downs,
with Cifers and Evans sweeping around the ends for big
yardage, they reached Green Bay's seven and on one 
play from here they scored. Evans passed to Jansante
in the end zone. It was just as simple as that - and the
parade was on. Morales intercepted Comp's pass on
Pittsburgh's 35 early in the second quarter, and away the
Steelers went again. On three more first downs - the
Steelers piled up 12 in the first half not counting the
touchdowns - they reached Green Bay's 26, then on 
fourth down sent Glamp back to the 33 for his goal. A
poor punt by Jacobs, which sailed seven yard out of
bounds on Green Bay's 34, gave the Steelers position 
for their second touchdown a few minutes later. On two
first downs, they reached Green Bay's 11, on an offside
penalty they moved down to the six, and on four heavy
assaults by Shipkey, they rammed the ball home. By this time, it was a hopelessly disorganized Packer eleven, and the very next time the Steelers got the ball, on a punt on their own 45, they swept down the field again. It took only five plays, and it was a personal excursion for the $20,000 a year Evans. He ran around left end for 24, passed to Shipkey for four, passed to Cifers for 13, and then after throwing an incompleted pass, raced around left end for 14 yards and the touchdown. Only two seconds were left as Evans started on his jaunt and the half ended with Glamp's kick. The Steelers slowed down in the second half, although even at a reduced pace they scored a touchdown in each of the third and fourth quarters. In the third quarter, Glamp broke over right tackle and raced 56 yards across the goal, and in the fourth quarter, Tony Compagno intercepted one of Jacobs' passes on his own 18 and dashed 82 yards. It was the longest run of the National league season with an intercepted pass. The Packers through all this hopelessly futile, uninspired, indifferent. In the last minute, though, they suddenly broke out with their consolation touchdown on a drive from their own 26 yard line. Comp passed 40 yards to Smith who ran 15 yards more to Pittsburgh's 19, and on third down from here with exactly 50 seconds left, Girard passed to Goodnight deep in the end zone for the score. Fritsch converted.
GREEN BAY  -  0  0  0  7 -  7
PITTSBURGH -  7 17  7  7 - 38
1st - PITT - Val Jansante, 7-yard pass from Ray Evans (Joe Glamp kick) PITT 7-0
2nd - PITT - Glamp, 33-yard field goal PITTSBURGH 10-0
2nd - PITT - Jerry Shipkey, 1-yard run (Glamp kick) PITTSBURGH 17-0
2nd - PITT - Evans, 14-yard run (Glamp kick) PITTSBURGH 24-0
3rd - PITT - Glamp, 55-yard run (Glamp kick) PITTSBURGH 31-0
4th - PITT - Tony Compagno, 82-yard interception return (Glamp kick) PITTSBURGH 38-0
4th - GB - Goodnight, 19-yard pass from Girard (Fritsch kick) PITTSBURGH 38-7
NEWS AND NOTES
'GET LAMBEAU' MOVE GROWS; BAYS SEEK 'SPIRIT'
NOVEMBER 10 (Green Bay) - With the Packers suffering from their worst season in history, the "Get Lambeau" contingent is operating with a full head of steam, but a new development may result in sparking the players to look like the Packers of old. The development:
Larry Craig, veteran end, and Baby Ray, veteran tackle, are
going to team up to try to rebuild the traditional Packers spirit,
missing so far this year. There are 13 new men on the Packer
squad this year. Many of them apparently haven't learned that
the "old college try" is part of Packer psychology, even though
the Packers are professionals. Lack of a field leader has been 
a big problem this year, and the Craig-Ray combination may
make up for it. The "Get Lambeau" group consists of many
Green Bay citizens, including some former players who simply
don't like the Packer coach. They are always active, but the
poor showing of the team this year has given them a more
effective weapon. However, a check of Packer Corporation
directors indicates Lambeau's position is as strong as ever.
Fans are complaining on the street corners and in letters to
newspaper and radio stations. In most instances, these
complaints boil down to a bewildered "What's the matter?" 
Team officials aren't attempting alibis, but they do point to the
13 new men; the injuries which have plagued the squad, some
bad breaks in officiating. As to injuries, there was a long period
when only one left halfback was available with Provo, Smith and
Girard injured, and for five weeks Jacobs was the only passing
quarterback available, with Comp and Moss hurt. Yet Packer
officials are inclined to place much of the blame on the lack of
that intangible thing called "spirit". While they aren't saying so
publicly, they undoubtedly hope the Craig-Ray project pays off,
at least for the Bear game.
TODAY'S $64 PRO PUZZLE: THE PACKERS
NOVEMBER 10 (Chicago Tribune) - Chicago's own curious
football fans - to the number of 50,000 - will have a chance 
Sunday to search for themselves the answer to pro football's
question of the year: "What's the matter with the Green Bay
Packers?" The once sturdy denizens of Wisconsin's northland,
famous since the National league's infant days, has assimilated
three straight defeats. That's five in all, because earlier in the
season they were batted around by the Bears and the Cards.
On Sunday they're coming into Wrigley field where, in the past,
they have scored many upsets. The last notable one was in
1941, forcing a sectional playoff which the Bears won. Let's
recap this most curious of recent Packer seasons: At the
beginning of the race, the Packers were held in esteem comparable to that of the Bears and Cardinals. They rushed through a pre-season schedule with victories over Pittsburgh, New York and Washington - and then whacked the Boston Yanks, 31 to 0, in the league opener. The Packers actually were favorites to whip the Bears in Green Bay on September 29, but then came the first stunner, a 45 to 7 Chicago victory. The Packers recovered sufficiently to whip Detroit, 33 to 21. Then the Cards took aim at Curly Lambeau's eleven for a 17 to 7 decision. Again the Packers rallied, blanking the Los Angeles Rams, 16 to 0. Then followed losses of 23 to 7 to Washington, 24 to 20 to Detroit, and last Sunday's 38 to 7 flop to Pittsburgh. "There is no single major reason involved in the Packers' failures," said George Strickland, Lambeau's assistant, when asked to diagnose the trouble. "There are a whole lot of things to blame," he explained. "Jack Jacobs, for instance, has been bothered by a sore arm and the threat of appendicitis. Perry Moss and Earl Girard, two of our new men, were delayed because of injuries before the season started. Irv Comp has been slowed by an injured ankle. In fact, 10 of our players had ailments of one sort or another before the Pittsburgh game. After it was over, the total had grown to 14. We're whacked up more than a little, physically. And maybe, in the hunt for what's wrong, there hasn't been quite enough effort on the part of some of the players. If you want more reports - Bob Flowers, our best center, has a leg injury, Dick Wildung has a sacroiliac condition and didn't play against the Steelers. Fred Provo, a rookie back, has been held back by a bruised arm. Tony Canadeo's leg was hurt against the Lions two games ago and last Sunday he suffered a shoulder bruise. When Moss finally was ready to play, the long inactivity had taken the edge off his game and he had to start all over again." Of course, the Bears, who returned home yesterday from their successful California invasion, will tell their players not believe a word of such tripe - that it's only a psychological trap such as the wily Mons. Lambeau can spring on an unsuspecting team. The Bears went through a brief, warmup drill yesterday afternoon. A more thorough report on Johnny Lujack's back injury is expected today.
LUJACK, CONNOR STAY TOGETHER - EVEN IN HOSPITAL
NOVEMBER 11 (Chicago Tribune) - The Chicago Bears yesterday started building a hospital list to combat the jumbo injury roll claimed by their opponents of Sunday in Wrigley field, the Green Bay Packers. Johnny Lujack and George Connor, the inseparables from Notre Dame, are occupying two cots in the Illinois Masonic hospital. It is doubtful if Lujack will be able to play Sunday against the team which was the Bears' opponent in his professional debut last September, but there is nothing more seriously wrong with Connor than an ulcerative stomach it is, the doctor said. Lujack suffered a bruised back muscle in Sunday's game at Los Angeles, it was disclosed after an exhaustive probing of the valuable chattel. There was no spine injury and neither were the kidneys involved in the incident. Lujack was injured making a key tackle in the fourth quarter. The Rams' end caught a forward pass and lateraled to tackle Dick Huffman on a third down play. Lujack moved in for the tackle and a Ram blocker tried to get in front of Huffman to clear a path. But Johnny struck the tackle and brought him down two yards short of a first down. The Rams then were forced to punt a time when the Bears were in front by only 7 to 0. The back muscle is so painful, Lujack is unable to stoop to tie his shoe laces. At yesterday's press conference, first of the year, Halas said rookie Jim Canady, speedy halfback from Texas, will start working out after undergoing a recent heel operation. Halas admitted his toughest chore between now and Sunday is convincing the Bears that the Packers could be much rougher than they were in losing at Green Bay, 45 to 7.
OLSONOSKI IS HURT IN BLOCKING DRILL
NOVEMBER 12 (Green Bay) - Green Bay's task against the Chicago Bears Sunday was complicated further Thursday when Larry Olsonoski, rookie guard and linebacker from Minnesota, suffered a shoulder injury in a blocking drill. Olsonoski, who has been playing on defense most of the time, was the 15th man to go on the Packers' hospital list. Trainer Bud Jorgenson said he was unable to make a complete diagnosis of the injury, pending X-rays, but that he believed Olsonoski would not be available for more than part time duty.
Bay, Larry has gone to the trainer for repairs. Larry, who has played in 105 consecutive NFL games and countless exhibitions without injury since joining the club, aggravated a slight leg injury Sunday in Pittsburgh. Mr. Craig was reported among the 14 Packers who were unable to participate in yesterday's double drills, morning and afternoon. For years, Larry was Don Hutson's "muscle". When the Packers lost the ball, the South Carolinian moved in from his blocking spot and played defense at end, taking the bumps while Don operated at safety. The Bears, to date, are running a poor second to the Packers in the hospital sweepstakes. Green Bay fans considered the dispatching of Johnny Lujack and Moose Connor to the hospital only a weak countermove. Incarceration of Connor, they argued, was downright laughable. They never before had heard of ulcerative stomachitis. "Neither had I," admitted Connor yesterday. Meanwhile, fans were reported courting physical prostration hunting for tickets, but also the December 12 battle against the Cardinals on the same field. Only George Halas seemed healthy. Not only that, but happy.
BEARS HEAVY FAVORITES TO WHIP PACKERS
NOVEMBER 13 (Chicago) - Conceded only the tiniest
chance of scoring one of their infrequent wins this fall,
the battered Green Bay Packers holed up here tonight
on the eve of their annual sellout battle with the Bears
at Wrigley field tomorrow. George Halas' monsters of
the midway, easy victors some weeks ago at Green
Bay, are growing stronger by the week while the once
high-geared Bays are almost as low mentally as they
are physically. Oddsmakers have made the Bears a 20
point favorite, and off the recent Packer performances
this is the most conservative. The Halasmen, with 
Johnny Lujack and Sid Luckman clicking, could make 
it a rout. Coach Curly Lambeau, who in the past has
plotted form reversals, admitted that a dozen Packers
were nursing injuries which would materially affect their
play but was confident they would make a game of it
while they lasted. An all-time record crowd, which 
reflects the intensity of this quarter century rivalry, is
assured. Over 50,000 tickets have already been sold
and the few still left should be gone by the 1 p.m.
kickoff. The early start is to prevent darkness from
blanketing the field in the late stages. Other National
league games have the Chicago Cardinals at 
Pittsburgh, Detroit at Washington, Boston at
Philadelphia and Los Angeles at New York.
BEARS FORSAKE PASS ATTACKS, TURN ON
POWER
NOVEMBER 13 (Chicago Tribune) - The Chicago Bears,
despite possession of two of the finest passers in pro
football - Johnny Lujack and Sid Luckman - have made
a startling return to their pre-war bone crushing tactics,a turn about from the last two seasons when a passing game ruled their attack. Return to the old pattern started in the opening game this fall, a 45 to 7 rout of the Green Bay Packers in which the Bears completed only six of of 12 passes for a meager 57 yards. Tomorrow, in Wrigley Field, the Bears will take their second shot at the Packers and the evidence to date indicates they'll shoot for victory along the ground. Last year the Bears passed for 3,093 yards in 12 games. In seven outings this season they have gained only 957 yards in the air. In 1947, Ken Kavanaugh caught 13 touchdown passes, Jim Keane 10. To date, Ken has fielded four for scores and Jim only one. George Halas, coach of the Bears, long has been an advocate of a sound running game, primarily because it insures a team possession of the ball if it has the ability to gain. Last year the Bears' pass crazy attack brought a record 31 interceptions against Sid Luckman and four others against the team. This year only 10 Bear aerials have gone astray. The Bears' two Georges - Gulyanics and McAfee - are spearheading the team's new power offense. Gulyanics has rushed 68 times for 272 yards, and McAfee has blasted 65 times for 293 yards. In the face of all these figures, tomorrow could be the day for a breaking out of long distance air power. No duo like Keane and Kavanaugh is going to stay under control over a full campaign.
BEARS BIG FAVORITES OVER PACKERS TODAY
NOVEMBER 14 (Chicago) - The Green Bay Packers go to the
slaughter here Sunday. They meet the Chicago Bears at
Wrigley Field. Anything less than a topheavy Bear victory, in
light of what has happened so far this season, will come as a
surprise. Green Bay has lost five of its eight games and has
looked bad losing them. Soundest licking was administered by
the Bears themselves in an earlier game at Green Bay, 45 to 7.
On top of the discouraging record is the physical condition of
Green Bay. The team arrived here Saturday evening in perhaps
its worst physical shape of the fall. No fewer than 15 men 
nursed bruises and bumps of more than ordinary severity.
While not enough to keep them from the game, the injuries
will still almost certainly affect their play. The combination of
Green Bay's emotional collapse after a succession of bad
performances and the bad physical condition of the men has
led the oddsmakers to install the Bears three touchdown
favorites. It is the first time in years that anyone of George
Halas' elevens has rated such a pronounced edge. In the game
at Green Bay earlier the Packers were favored by three points.
Coach Curly Lambeau, in the midst of his worst season, has
tried desperately all week to reassemble his shattered forces,
but how well he has succeeded only the game itself will tell.
The chances are the team has been too badly shot to make
much of a fight of it. For the Bears the game is a "must". Tied
with the Chicago Cardinals for first place in the western division
of the race, the Bears must win to remain there. The Cardinals
will meet the lowly Pittsburgh Steelers at Pittsburgh. Despite
the probability it won't be much of a game, the largest crowd
ever to see a game in Wrigley field will probably sit in on the
proceedings. In excess of 50,000 seats were sold Saturday 
night. Only a few thousand remained. The kickoff is scheduled
for 1 o'clock - one hour earlier than usual because of the
shortened daylight at this time of the year. Johnny Lujack,
injured in the Bears' game with Los Angeles last week, will be
ready to play.
EXPECT 50,123 TO SEE PACKERS INVADE BEARS
NOVEMBER 14 (Chicago Tribune) - If there's any spark left in the physically and mentally wounded Green Bay Packers, today's the day it will ignite. The big men from the north, burdened with three consecutive NFL defeats and five in all, will go into this afternoon's battle against the Bears rated 21 points inferior to their traditional opponents. They will come together before the largest Chicago crowd in NFL history. Wrigley Field's setup, including the new bleacher along the east sideline, plus standing room, will accommodate an estimated 50,123 fans. Never have the Bears reach the 50,000 figure. It's No. 61 in the series which started in 1921 when the Bears (then the Staleys) won in Cubs park, 20 to 0. The only crowd mentioned in the account of that game referred to 300 fans who accompanied the Packers to Chicago. The Bears won 33, tied 5, and lost 22 in the all-time competition. The series has become somewhat tarnished in recent seasons, contributing factors being a startling slide by the Packers and an upsurge by the Bears. The Packers have lost 10 of their last 13 meetings with the northsiders. The Bears' candidate for rookie of the season honors, Johnny Lujack, will be in uniform, but has a back injury and will be used only for kicking of points after touchdowns. Lujack's availability will put the pressure on Sid Luckman, who is used to it. In Sid's time as a Bear, which goes back to 1939, the team has won 16 of 20 engagements from the Packers. J.R. Boone, the little man from Oklahoma, is listed to start at left half for the Bears, a spot which has been reserved in previous games for George Gulyanics. J.R., with six touchdowns, is the Bears' leading scorer. Gulyanics is not up to par from the effects of a rib injury suffered in the New York game two weeks ago, but he'll play.
PACKERS PART OF PRO'S TRADITIONAL SETUP
NOVEMBER 12 (Milwaukee Sentinel-Lloyd Larson) - In the process of dreaming up plans for making one pro football league out of the two that now exist, there has been a lot of loose talk about squeezing Green Bay out of the picture. That's easier said than done, of course. It would take some All-American squeezing to get the Packers out of there. They were in on the ground floor and have no intentions of giving up. What's more, cutting off Green Bay would mean the elimination of pro football's one real sure-fire traditional game: Packers vs. Bears. That's something the colleges have in abundance and the pros need more of - games which draw regardless of the records of the competing teams or a prospective uneven match. Consider the situation for Sunday. The Bears, tied with the Cardinals for first place in the National league's western division are heavy favorites to give the Packers the works for the second time this season. The Bears have won six and lost one. The Packers, with five defeats and three wins, are definitely out of the running. Yet this game will draw some 50,000 customers to Wrigley Field. Which means a sellout. And the pros need sellouts to balance the heavy modern budgets and pave the way for possible profits on investments...PUBLICITY ISN'T THE ANSWER: Papa Bear George Halas' publicity department has taken nothing for granted. The interest arousers have been pouring out blurbs like this: "Word from Green Bay is to the effect that Curly Lambeau has his Packers up for the first time this season. All injured players are expected to be ready. Packer followers already have informed the team they will forget everything that went on before it the team trounces the Bears." And this: "Halas has warned his Bears they can expect one of their toughest ball games Sunday. He has pointed out that past records and past scores mean nothing when the Bears and Packers meet; that Green Bay scored the greatest upset of 1941 by defeating the mightiest of all Bear teams in Wrigley Field." Strictly corn out of the can which doesn't fill the park when any other second division club plays at Wrigley Field. So it can't be the answer to the Bear-Packer pulling power...NOR CAN IT BE THE STATISTICS: A study of the season's statistics occasionally give rise to upset hopes and create desires on the part of ticket buyers. But not in this case. First downs, yards gained, forward passing average, touchdowns, total points, defensive records - everything points to definite Bear superiority. Not a chance for a rose colored view of the 45-7 score in the first game at Green Bay. There's no law against a miracle reversal of form, to be sure. On the face of things, though, it shouldn't happen. So there must be something about a Bear-Packer game - something beyond winning or losing and the score - that grips the fans. Maybe it's assurance of rock-and-sock in abundance, if not a real brawl. Or memory of great deeds of the past. Or the big city vs. small town angle. Anyway, it all adds up to a traditional meeting which, in turn, means financial harvest. For that reason alone, the Packers won't be given the brushoff. The astute and influential Halas will see to that.
​BEARS, PACKERS SNIFF ARNICA ON EVE OF BATTLE
NOVEMBER 12 (Chicago Tribune) - This is going to be football's arnica battle, or bottle, of the century, this 61st meeting of the Bears and the Green Bay Packers in Wrigley field Sunday. The appelation became official yesterday with startling news from the Wisconsin northland that a chink finally has been chipped from the armor of Larry Craig, the indestructible Packer. For the first time in his 10 seasons with Green Bay, Larry has gone to the trainer for repairs. Larry, who has played in 105 consecutive NFL games and countless exhibitions without injury since joining the club, aggravated a slight leg injury Sunday in Pittsburgh. Mr. Craig was reported among the 14 Packers who were unable to participate in yesterday's double drills, morning and afternoon. For years, Larry was Don Hutson's "muscle". When the Packers lost the ball, the South Carolinian moved in from his blocking spot and played defense at end, taking the bumps while Don operated at safety. The Bears, to date, are running a poor second to the Packers in the hospital sweepstakes. Green Bay fans considered the dispatching of Johnny Lujack and Moose Connor to the hospital only a weak countermove. Incarceration of Connor, they argued, was downright laughable. They never before had heard of ulcerative stomachitis. "Neither had I," admitted Connor yesterday. Meanwhile, fans were reported courting physical prostration hunting for tickets, but also the December 12 battle against the Cardinals on the same field. Only George Halas seemed healthy. Not only that, but happy.
BEARS, PACKERS SNIFF ARNICA ON EVE OF BATTLE
NOVEMBER 12 (Chicago Tribune) - This is going to be football's arnica battle, or bottle, of the century, this 61st meeting of the Bears and the Green Bay Packers in Wrigley field Sunday. The appelation became official yesterday with startling news from the Wisconsin northland that a chink finally has been chipped from the armor of Larry Craig, the indestructible Packer. For the first time in his 10 seasons with Green