GAME RECAP (MILWAUKEE JOURNAL)
(GREEN BAY) - A pesky bunch of New York Yankees who
hadn't won a football game all season snatched victory
right out of the hands of the Green Bay Packers here
Sunday afternoon with a tingling three touchdown rally in
the fourth quarter. The score was 31-28. Or maybe tingling
rally isn't exactly right except to the small band of Yankees
themselves. They loved it. It gave them the first victory of
the campaign. But it was also the cause of Green Bay's
fifth straight defeat and who in a turnout of 14,297 loyal
fans could really tingle about that? A guy by the name of
Bob Celeri - old Celery Head they called him in his college
days in California - did the job, and it was one of the most
spectacular the old field up here has seen in a long time.
Celeri, a San Francisco cast-off last year who was picked
up by the Yankees in desperation after this season had
begun, took charge as the teams changed goals for the
fourth quarter and in almost less time than it takes to tell
turned a 21-10 deficit into a lead and eventual victory.
BING! BANG! BONG!
On the first play of the fourth quarter, he hurled a 53-yard
touchdown pass to Dan Edwards, which made it 21-17. On
the second play, the very next time the Yankees got the
ball, which was a minute later, he hurled a 31-yard pas to
Edwards again for a 24-21 lead. And a couple of minutes
later still, he hurled a 41-yard touchdown pass to Buddy
Young which made it 31-21, which the Packers
subsequently closed to 31-28 in the closing minutes. All
told in this amazing rally, the Yankees had the ball on six
plays and Celeri threw touchdown passes on three of
them. Celeri's passes weren't the kind that are
diagrammed so neatly in football textbooks, either, you
know the kind with the passer fading back surely behind
good blocking, or stepping up into a solid pocket and then
easily hitting a man all alone downfield. Celeri was rushed
on all three of the touchdown passes as he probably hasn't been rushed this fall. He darted here and there as he evaded his pursuers, zigzagged across the field, and then, with men still on top of him, hurled the ball when it seemed the Packers would stuff it right down his throat.
SUMMERHAYS FOOLED
On the first of these touchdowns, Edwards slipped behind Bob Summerhays and took the pass on the dead run. Summerhays nailed Edwards on the eight, but couldn't hold him and Edwards got up to scramble across the goal line. On the second, perhaps the most spectacular of the lot since Celeri wasted a good half minute or more darting all over the field. Edwards took the pass in the end zone. And on the third, the fleet Young, who bounded down the field like a deer, took the ball on the 15 and tore away from Rip Collins, who apparently had him well-covered. Until Celeri's heroics, the Packers apparently had the game in hand. They not only held the 21-10 lead as the fourth quarter began, but they had clearly looked like the better team. They scored a touchdown on Fred Cone's one-yard plunge in the first quarter, another on a 49-yard pass play from Tobin Rote to Ray Pelfrey in the third quarter, and a third touchdown on Rote's fine 55-yard run a couple of minutes later. In addition, they had a touchdown on a 36-yard pass from Rote to Dom Moselle nullified by a penalty in the third quarter and a possible touchdown deprived them on a fumbled handoff between Bobby Thomason and Tony Canadeo in the first quarter. The Yankees recovered. The Yankees, until Celeri changed the complexion of the game, meanwhile had done little. They got their first real position on an interception late in the second quarter, immediately after Moselle's touchdown had been recalled, and scored on an 11-yard pass, George Ratterman to Young. And they added three points on Harvey Johnson's 34-yard field goal in the third quarter. Except for this, though, they hardly threatened. Except for Meisenheimer's interception preceding their touchdown, they never penetrated Green Bay's 40 in the first half and they got inside only twice in the third quarter. They seemed well in hand as the fatal fourth quarter began. One last dying bid the Packers made after the Yankees had run the score to 31-21. They scored their final touchdown on a 6-yard pass, Rote to Moselle, with 2:30 left. They were back in the game. But they never laid hands on the ball again. The Yankees subsequently received the kickoff and on seven plays, all rushes, ran out the clock. They were on Green Bay's 34 as the game ended. A lot of little things again cropped up to spoil the good football the Packers played. They had five passes intercepted by an alert Yankee secondary. They fumbled twice and lost the ball both times. And they drew one of their 15-yard penalties at the worst time because of an infraction by a man who was hardly in the play. It cost them Moselle's touchdown. So it goes. The Packers will now hike themselves to the West Coast when next Sunday they will meet the San Francisco 49ers and a week late the Los Angeles Rams.
NO MORE NO. 14
Don Hutson's old jersey, No. 14, was retired by the Green Bay Packers as part of the homecoming ceremonies between halves of Sunday's game in Green Bay. Packer blankets were also awarded to the six Packers who have been named to the Helms Hall of Fame: Arnie Herber, Johnny Blood, Clark Hinkle, Cal Hubbard, Curly Lambeau and Hutson. Hubbard, Lambeau and Hinkle were not present.
NEW YORK YANKS -  0  7  3 21 - 31
GREEN BAY      -  7  0 14  7 - 28
1st - GB - Canadeo, 1-yard run (Cone kick) GREEN BAY 7-0
2nd - NYY - Buddy Young, 11-yard pass from George Ratterman (Harvey Johnson kick) YANKS 7-3
3rd - GB - Pelfrey, 49-yard pass from Rote (Cone kick) GREEN BAY 14-7
3rd - GB - Rote, 55-yard run (Cone kick) GREEN BAY 21-7
3rd - NYY - Johnson, 34-yard field goal GREEN BAY 21-10
4th - NYY - Dan Edwards, 53-yard pass from Bob Celeri (Johnson kick) GB 21-17
4th - NYY - Edwards, 31-yard pass from Celeri (Johnson kick) NY YANKS 24-21
4th - NYY - Buddy Young, 41-yd pass from Celeri (Johnson kick) NY YANKS 31-21
4th - GB - Moselle, 6-yard pass from Rote (Cone kick) NEW YORK YANKS 31-28
NEWS AND NOTES
PACKERS LUCK TYPICAL OF THE 'HAVE NOTS'
DECEMBER 4 (Milwaukee Sentinel-Lloyd Larson) - According to an ungrammatical old axiom that seems to apply in all walks of like, sports included, "them that has gets". If that's true, it must be equally true that "them that don't have don't get". At least, the reverse slant works out in the case of the Green Bay Packers. Rebuilding and still undermanned, they needed all possible breaks to be up there battling the Rams, Lions and Bears for pro football's National division crown. Instead, the wrong thing always happened at the wrong time in game after game. As a result, they're buried deep in fifth place as they head west for the final games of the season at San Francisco and Los Angeles. All teams fumble on occasions, and all has passes intercepted and draw penalties, too. But seldom to things like that prove as costly to a team as they have to the Packers all season long. Sunday's windup with the New York Yanks was just another example. In the first quarter, with first down on the four, a fumble not only cost an almost certain touchdown but lost the ball and 20 yards as well. A scoring pass play, which would have given Gene Ronzani's boys a two touchdown lead well into the second period, was nullified by the first penalty of consequence against them. To add insult to injury, the replay brought an interception that set up the tying touchdown for the Yanks after they had been completely outplayed for 28 minutes...MORE OF THE BOOMERANG BUSINESS: A first down pass from the Yanks' 11 boomeranged early in the third quarter, via an end zone interception and a counterdrive which set up the field goal that ultimately meant the difference between defeat and a tie. In spite of it all, the Bays again had everything under control with a 21-10 lead going into the final quarter. Then the wild jumping jack, Bob Celeri, knocked 'em for a loop with three of the most sensational touchdown passes ever seen at Green Bay. But it took two more pass interceptions to pave the way for the superman act by Celeri & Co. They would have had the noose around their necks if the Packers had retained possession and had at least nudged the Yanks deep into their own territory via kicks. So once again the team that needs break had things go the wrong way. Needs break because it is short about four or five big time operators - particularly a tackle or two, an end and some height in the secondary. The sad part of it is that the pattern has been pretty much the same all season. The Packers developed an interesting offense, dazzling if not always powerful. They scored points in pretty fair bundles in spite of a string of injuries. But they couldn't quite get over the hump...REMEMBER RAMS, LIONS, BEARS?: They blew a couple of touchdowns to let the mighty Rams off the hook right here in Milwaukee. What a good lead and the game well into the third quarter, it was a golden opportunity for an upset to say the least. Against the Lions on the ice-coated field in Green Bay, it was a combination of penalties (wiping out a scoring pass) and costly fumbles, one of which was picked off in the air by an opponent for a 54 yard runback - fumbles that came when the Lions were being pushed around rather vigorously. They had the Bears ready for the kill in Chicago and the Lions again in Detroit in the Thanksgiving thriller that was seen throughout the nation over TV. Which means that they were really outplayed and didn't have a chance in only two games: At Pittsburgh and in the home opener with the Bears. And means, too, that they deserved a better fate than winning only three out of 10 league games. Incidentally, Sunday's duel was one of the best I've ever seen late in the season between two teams going nowhere in the standings. The Packers, of course, have their usual collegiate type backing to spur them on and play accordingly to the very end. But how the Yanks managed to stir up enthusiasm I'll never know. They haven't had solid direction from the front office. Nor much public acceptance in New York. Yet no one would have guessed they were trying for the first win of the season. Naturally, that's the way it should be because pro football players are paid entertainers. But paid entertainers don't always respond so well.
Former Green Bay Packers players receive blankets for their selection to the Helms Foundation Hall of Fame for college football players. From left are Don Hutson, Charley Brock, Cub Buck accepting for Cal Hubbard, R.E. Lambeau accepting for Curly Lambeau, Johnny "Blood" McNally and Arnie Herber. This was during halftime of the Packers’ 31-28 loss to the New York Yanks at old City Stadium on Dec. 2, 1951. (Source: Green Bay Press-Gazette) This was the annual "homecoming" game for the Packers, and a very special one. In addition to commemorating the induction of six former Packers into the Helms College Hall of Fame (the above five plus Clarke Hinkle, who was also unable to attend), the Packers retired their first-ever jersey number. Don Hutson's famous #14 was retired in the same halftime ceremony that saw the former Packers receive their blankets. (Source: Packersuniforms.blogspot.com)








NATIONAL CONFERENCE - STANDINGS
Los Angeles       7   3   0   .700  328  223
Detroit           6   3   1   .667  295  216
Chicago Bears     6   4   0   .600  227  237
San Francisco     5   4   1   .556  203  169
GREEN BAY         3   7   0   .300  221  302
New York Yanks    1   7   2   .125  203  310
Sunday December 2nd
San Francisco 20, DETROIT 10 - The Detroit Lions were jarred out of first place in the National Conference race Sunday by the San Francisco 49ers, who assumed the role of giant killers and won, 20-10, before a crowd of 52,024. The 49ers, far out of the title race, bottled up the Lions without a touchdown for 43 minutes. John Strzykalski's 1-yard plunge in the first period put the 49ers in front and Y.A. Tittle passed for two touchdowns in the second half. A fourth period Lion fumble set up the 49ers' final score. With Bob Hoernschemeyer, their leading ground gainer, sidelined by a first period concussion, the Lions showed no scoring punch. Doak Walker kicked a 23-yard field in the second period to make it 6-3, and missed another from 15 yards minutes later. In the third quarter, the Lions punched to the four-yard line, where the 49ers recovered Pat Harder's fumble. Strzykalski's scoring plunge ended a 90-yard drive the first time the 49ers got the ball. Gordy Soltau's attempt for conversion was blocked. Tittle passed touchdown passes for 23 yards to Bill Jessup and 13 yards to Joe Arenas. Detroit finally scored a touchdown on Bobby Layne's 30-yard pass to end Dorne Dibble. Joe Perry's 126 yards in 22 carries led the 49ers' attack. Layne's scoring toss gave him 25 touchdown passes this season. The 49ers covered his receivers well, and he completed only 11 of 32 attempts.
Los Angeles 42, CHICAGO BEARS 17 - The Chicago Bears, after taking a 14-0 lead, suffered their worst defeat of the current NFL race Sunday, 42-17, by the Los Angeles Rams before 50,286 at Wrigley Field. The Rams' 91-yard touchdown pass play in the first quarter was the longest of the season and only eight yards short of the league record. Bob Waterfield hit Elroy Hirsch at midfield and Hirsch romped the rest of the way. Hirsch caught three passes in the game for 106 yards. This gave him a total of 1,268 yard s in 54 receptions and shattered the league's season yardage record of 1,211 set by Green Bay's Don Hutson in 1942. The touchdown was Hirsch's 14th and kept him hot on the heels of Detroit's Doak Walker for the scoring championship. The Rams' seventh victory in 10 starts puts them on top of the National Conference as Detroit lost. The bewildered Bears scored all 17 of their points in the first period but trailed 21-17 at halftime. The Rams were paced by Dan Towler with 76 yards in 14 carries and Tank Younger with 71 in 7. Waterfield completed five of seven passes for 187 yards; Norm Van Brocklin eight of 12 for 120. Chuck Hunsinger was the Bears' best gainer with 95 yards in 13 trips, while Johnny Lujack hit on only seven of 20 tosses for 95. Lujack scored twice in the first eight minutes of the game on short quarterback sneaks to cap drives of 80 and 35 yards. George Blanda booted a 27-yard field goal. In addition to the 91-yard pass payoff, here is how the Rams scored: Second Period - 1) 89 yards in eight plays, featuring Hoerner's 20- and 18-yard runs and Van Brockling's 18-yard toss to Tom Fears. Van Brocklin's 11-yard pitch to Fears scored. 2) 80 yards in seven plays, led by Younger's 20-yard run and Van Brocklin's 35-yard pass to Towler. Van Brocklin sneaked from the one. Third Period - 3) 80 yards in seven plays, with Waterfield's pass to Younger for 52 yards setting it up. Towler tallied from the three. Fourth Period - 4) 80 yards in eight plays, with Younger's 23-yard run and 23-yard catch from Waterfield providing the momentum. Towler ran the final 16. 5) 28 yards in two plays after blocking a punt. Van Brocklin pitched eight to Fears and Younger ran the last 20.
LAMBEAU QUITS CARDINAL POST; CLAIMS FRONT OFFICE INTERFERENCE
DECEMBER 7 (Chicago) - Curly Lambeau, one of the greatest names in the history of professional football, was just another guy looking for a job today. The colorful Belgian resigned his $25,000 a year job as coach of the Chicago Cardinals Friday in an atmosphere of bitterness. "No man can do a satisfactory job when constantly harassed by second guessers in the front office," he said. Lambeau's resignation will become effective December 16th, after the Cardinals' game with the Chicago Bears. It was accepted Friday night by Walter Wolfner, the club's managing director, and husband of the former Violet Bidwell who inherited the club after her first husband died. Lambeau said he hoped to continue his career in professional football provided he can be associated with an organization that will give him equality of opportunity with other coaches in the NFL. "I regret leaving Chicago where Cardinal fans have supported us loyally and I am especially sorry to part company with the players, who have given me all the cooperation any coach could ask," Lambeau said. "However, I obviously don't fit the Cardinal organization. A man has little chance to build morale when management interferes with the normal relationship between a player and his coach. This is true particularly when the office manager, through inexperience, has little knowledge of the problems
New York Yanks (1-7-2) 31, Green Bay Packers (3-7) 28
Sunday December 2nd 1951 (at Green Bay)
CURLY LAMBEAU BLAMED FOR CARDS' POOR SHOWING
DECEMBER 5 (Chicago) - Curly Lambeau has not been ousted as coach of the Chicago Cardinals, but he has not been assured that he will be retained next year, either, managing director Walter Wolfner said Wednesday. "Lambeau's made mistakes," Wolfner said. "They've been mistakes of omission and not commission. There have been things he could have cured, had he done something, but he didn't. We're not going to take any hasty action," he said. "We don't know what we're going to do. Curly's contract runs until February 1st, but the draft is in January and we'll know before then what we're going to do." Lambeau, a 30-year veteran with the Green Bay Packers, signed up with the Cardinals for two years as head coach in 1950. Since then, however, Wolfner has replaced Ray Bennigsen as managing director of the club. "There's no harmony among the coaches," Wolfner said. "They're still at loggerheads most of the time, not speaking to each other sometimes. They've had the material. Why, with the players we've got on this team, they ought to be fighting for the championship. Paul Brown told me last Sunday, after he beat us, that the Cardinals were the best team the Browns faced. He said that if he coaches a team in the all-star game again, he's going to use six of out players on his first team. Look at the statistics of that Brown game. We outplayed them, ran them into the ground, in the second half. Fumbles cost us the game. It's been that way all season. It's just a combination of things wrong with the club." Wolfner denied that the Cardinals may be sold, no matter how they finish.
PACKER QUARTERBACKS TOPS IN LEAGUES
DECEMBER 6 (Milwaukee) - You may not believe it, in view of the team standings, but the Green Bay Packers have the two best quarterbacks in the NFL. Tobin Rote, operating the past few weeks off the new "single-back" offense, has the top rushing average in the league, and Bobby Thomason owns the best passing percentage. This unusual situation was revealed Wednesday in weekly league statistics released at the Philadelphia headquarters. The Packers, as a team, are battling to keep out of the National Conference cellar, an unenviable assignment since they close the season on the West Coast against the league-leading Los Angeles Rams and the potent San Francisco 49ers. Green Bay currently has a 3-7 record. Rote's performance in recent weeks, since his ability as a runner was uncovered, has verged on the sensational. Playing off the spread which leaves him the only man in the backfield, the ex-Rice ace has averaged 8.8 yards per carry, the best in the league. Rote rates ninth, however, among individual ground gainers with 451 yards in 51 tries. Thomason, who continues to operate off the regular T-formation, hold the 15th spot among the league's passers but actually has the top completion mark. He has hit on 57.8 percent of his tosses, 115 of 199, gaining 1,233 yards and accounting for 11 touchdowns with nine interceptions.
that confront a coach." Lambeau said Mrs. Wolfner had always been considerate of the team's problems. He strongly indicated his trouble lay entirely with Wofner. Jimmy Conzelman and Buddy Parker also resigned as Cardinal coaches in recent years after alleged run-ins with Wolfner. Ray Bennigsen, who hired Lambeau, resigned as general manager months ago. Wolfner in accepting Lambeau's resignation said that Curly "lost control of his assistant coaches and his players as well - and hasn't even spoken with one of his assistants for the last three weeks." He also charged Lambeau with alibis after losing games and placing the blame on his aides. Wolfner's charge of squabbling between Lambeau and his assistants has been aired publicly most of the season. It is no secret there has been little harmony. After the Cardinals beat the Bears October 7th, Phil Handler, line coach, reportedly handed in his resignation, which was accepted. The next day Handler was persuaded to return. Players had to separate Lambeau and Handler during an altercation on the sidelines. When the Cards lost to the Redskins in Washington October 21st, Cecil Isbell, backfield coach, also reportedly resigned. He, too, was persuaded to come back. "From time to time, the lack of discipline on the club has been apparent," said Wolfner. "We took no action from the front office in restoring discipline, leaving that entirely in Lambeau's hands." Lambeau categorically denied Wolfner's charges. "I've never blamed my assistants in my life," he said. "I've always shouldered full responsibility for any losses. There is hardly a coaching setup in the nation in which there is complete agreement. But club owners certainly don't air this kind of thing in public." Assistant coaches Isbell, Handler and Buster Ramsey were not available for comment. Wolfner said Lambeau "had 100 percent free hand in selecting players and his coaching staff. I never interfered with his actual coaching of the team, but there seemed to be continuous squabbling between him and his assistants," Wolfner added. Lambeau, whose Green Bay Packers won six NFL titles in his 31-year tenure with that club, said he decided to resign at the end of the season soon after Benningsen quit as general manager. Lambeau's two-year contract with the Cardinals will expire next February 1st. "We won't need Lambeau to act for the Cardinals at the annual league draft of players in January," said Wolfner. "As for naming a successor to Lambeau, I haven't anyone in mind at this time." Lambeau's resignation left him looking for a job after 33 years of coaching. He spent 31 years with the Green Bay Packers, a club he organized as a 20-year old youth fresh out of Notre Dame. Lambeau took over the head coaching job of the Cardinals two years ago. In 1950, the Cardinals had a 5-7 record. So far this season they have won only twice in 10 starts.
LAMBEAU QUITS CARDS OVER RIFT WITH NEW BOSS
DECEMBER 7 (Chicago) - Earl (Curly) Lambeau, a pioneer of professional football as Green Bay Packer coach, Friday night resigned as head coach of the Chicago Cardinals, and the club's managing director charged him with losing control of his assistants and players. Walter Wolfner, accepting Lambeau's resignation effective at the end of the season, said that "Lambeau lost control of his assistant coaches and his players as well." "Lambeau hasn't even spoken to one of his assistants for the last three weeks," the managing director said. "This feeling can be attributed to Lambeau's alibying after losing games. He always blamed his assistants for the defeats." Lambeau categorically denied Wolfner's charges. "I've never blamed my assistants in my life," he said. "I've always shouldered full responsibility for any losses. There is hardly a coaching setup in the nation in which there is complete agreement. But club owners don't air this kind of thing in public." In resigning, Lambeau said, "I felt I just didn't fit into the Cardinal organization." Lambeau will remain as head coach for the team's last two games, with the Washington Redskins in Comiskey Park Sunday and with the Chicago Bears a week hence. His two year contract expires February 1. Assistant Coaches Cecil Isbell, Phil Handler and Buster Ramsey were not available for comment. Wolfner said that Lambeau "had 100 percent free hand in selecting players and his coaching staff." "I never interfered with his actual coaching of the team, but there seemed to be continuous squabbling between him and his assistants," Wolfner added. Lambeau, whose Packers won six National League titles in his 31-year tenure with the club, said he decided to resign at the end of the season soon after Ray Bennigsen quit as general manager of the Cardinals recently. Lambeau said he hopes to continue his career in professional football provided he can be associated with an organization that will give him equality of opportunity with other coaches in the National league. "I regret leaving Chicago where Cardinal fans have supported us loyally and I am especially sorry to part company with the players, who have given me all the cooperation any coach could ask," Lambeau said. "However, I don't fit into the Cardinal organization. A gridiron leader has little chance to build morale when management interferes with the normal relationship between a player and a coach. This is true particularly when the office manager, through inexperience, has little knowledge of the problems that beset a coach."