GAME RECAP (MILWAUKEE JOURNAL)
(MINNEAPOLIS) - Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers had the bounce when they needed it here Sunday and beat the Pittsburgh Steelers on Paul Hornung's 44 yard field goal with four seconds to go, 13-10. This was the last of the NFL exhibitions. Green Bay wound up with four victories and two defeats and some badly needed confidence going into the league opener against the Chicago Bears at Green Bay a week hence. Besides a stirring victory, the Packers probably found their starting quarterback. Lamar McHan, the former Chicago Cardinal, moved the team proficiently in the fourth quarter, passing four yards to Hornung for Green Bay's only touchdown to break a 3-3 tie and passing 17 yards to Max McGee to set up Hornung's winning kick after the Steelers had caught up at 10-10 with only 21 seconds to play. After the game, Lombardi said, "McHan will have to be my starting quarterback against the Bears off what he showed out there today." Hornung scored all of Green Bay's points for the second straight game. He kicked a 34 yard field goal late in the second quarter for the only points in the first three periods. Tom Miner kicked a 15 yard field goal early in the fourth quarter for Pittsburgh's first points and the first tie and Tom Tracy ran 12 yards up the middle to effect the second tie as Bobby Layne guided the Steelers 99 yards with time running out. Miner kicked Pittsbugh's extra point and Hornung, Green Bay's.
HORNUNG TOP SCORER
Hornung scored 70 of Green Bay's 118 points in their six exhibition games. He had six touchdowns, four on runs and two on passes; seven field goals, including four in the last two games, and 13 out of 14 extra points. Green Bay's defense almost pitched a shutout Sunday. Rookie Tim Brown fumbled a punt and Pittsburgh recovered on Green Bay's 14, setting up its field goal. On the 99 yard drive, Green Bay apparently had taken over on downs on its 22 after Layne's fourth down pass to Gern Nagler was caught beyond the end zone, but the Packers were detected roughing Layne and Pittsburgh was given a first down on Green Bay's 12. "That's a helluva time to try to intimidate the passer," Green Bay defense coach Phil Bengtson said afterward. "You should try that on the first pass, not on the last."
PITT KICK BACKFIRES
After another incomplete pass, Layne sent Tracy through the middle on a simple trap play and Pittsburgh had a tie, or so it seemed. The Steelers however tried an onside kickoff. The ball dribbled to the left, two or three players touched it and finally a Packer knocked it out of bounds. So Green Bay had it on the Packer 43 with 11 seconds left. McHan hit McGee slanting toward the middle and the Tulane veteran made a fine catch. Time was called immediately, stopping the clock. Then Hornung, the former Notre Dame All-American from Louisville, booted it home for the victory. The Packer defensive team, which had not been particularly sharp in most previous games, dominated this one. Layne was thrown for 44 yards in losses trying to pass. Bobby Freeman and Bobby Dillon picked off interceptions and Nate Borden recovered a fumble. The Packer linebackers frequently blew in on Layne and either dumped him on the seat of his trousers or forced him to throw sooner than he wanted to or on the run.
RUGGED DEFENSE
Pittsburgh's defense, one of the finest in the league, made the Packers work. For the first time, Green Bay failed to gain 100 yards rushing. The Packers made 92, still not bad. The passing game, especially McHan's passing in the last quarter, made up somewhat for this. Pittsburgh actually outgained Green Bay from scrimmage, 253 yards to 247. It was that close. Joe Francis, the second year man from Oregon State, got his first starting chance at quarterback for Green Bay. He got only one first down in the first quarter and wasn't seen again. Before this, he had the inside track to carry the load against the league. Bart Starr of Alabama then took over. He managed to set up Hornung's first field goal as Jim Taylor ran 38 yards, sliding outside left tackle, but otherwise he, too, couldn't move the team. In his usual hard luck way, Starr threw a perfect 40 yard strike down the middle which rookie Brown dropped in the clear. It would have been a touchdown. McHan ran things the last half. He, too, had trouble getting Green Bay out of its backyard until late in the third period when he combined with Lew Carpenter on a 58 yard pass play to Pittsburgh's 26. Two plays later, however, Taylor fumbled and three plays after that Brown fumbled and Pittsburgh finally got on the scoreboard. McHan then completed four out of five passes and moved the Packers back to the lead, 79 yards in 13 plays. Hornung shook off Tom Barnett as he swung wide around left end and took McHan's touchdown pass.
LAYNE TO MATHEWS
Barnett fumble the ensuing kickoff out of bounds on Pittsburgh's one, but Layne got the Steelers on the march with three first down passes to Ray Mathews. Then after the Steelers tied the score with their second chance touchdown, Green Bay bounced back to win. A crowd of 18,081 saw the game, which was played for Catholic charity. They saw a whale of a finish. Lombardi said afterwards, "I liked the way the boys came back every time. They never let the breaks get them down. It wasn't a particularly good game for either team, but you'll get these kind, three or four out of 12 league games. If you can hang in there and win that kind, you get some place."
PITTSBURGH -  0  0  0 10 - 10
GREEN BAY  -  0  3  0 10 - 13
GB – Hornung, 34-yard field goal GREEN BAY 3-0
PIT – Tim Miner, 15-yard field goal TIED 3-3
GB – Hornung, 5-yard pass from McHan (Hornung kick) GREEN BAY 10-3
PIT - Tom Tracy, 12-yard run (Miner kick) TIED 10-10
GB – Hornung, 44-yard field goal GREEN BAY 13-10
NEWS AND NOTES
PACKERS CUT SMITH, BRAATZ, BUCKINGHAM
SEPTEMBER 22 (Milwaukee Journal) - Vince Lombardi trimmed fullback Dave Smith of Ripon, linebacker Tom Braatz of Marquette and tackle Ed Buckingham of Minnesota to bring the Packers down to the 36 player limit Tuesday for their NFL opener against the Chicago Bears at Green Bay Sunday. The Packers now have 21 players on offense and 15 on defense. Here is the roster:
OFFENSE
Ends (5) - Max McGee, Boyd Dowler, Gary Knafelc, Ron Kramer, A.D. Williams
Tackles (3) - Forrest Gregg, Bob Skoronski, Norm Masters
Guards (4) - Jerry Kramer, Fred Thurston, John Dittrich, Andy Cvercko
Center (1) - Jim Ringo
Quarterbacks (3) - Lamar McHan, Bart Starr, Joe Francis
Running Backs (5) - Paul Hornung, Jim Taylor, Lew Carpenter, Don McIlhenny, Tim Brown
DEFENSE
Linemen (5) - Bill Quinlan, Nate Borden, Dave Hanner, Henry Jordan, Jim Temp
Linebackers (4) - Bill Forester, Tom Bettis, Dan Currie, Ray Nitschke
Backs (6) - Bobby Freeman, Jesse Whittenton, Bobby Dillon, Emlen Tunnell, Hank Gremminger, John Symank
The decision to cut Smith, a native of Greendale, Wis., means that Carpenter, and perhaps Hornung, will play fullback as well as halfback. Taylor is the starter. Four offensive guards were kept because Cvercko, rookie from Northwestern, is limping on a sore knee which was twisted in the final exhibition game against Pittsburgh at Minneapolis Sunday. Of the 21 on the offensive platoon, 10 were not with the team last year. They are rookies Dowler, Williams, Brown and Cvercko, service returnees Ron Kramer and Skoronski and men obtained from other teams - Carpenter from Cleveland, McHan and Dittrich from the Chicago Cardinals and Thurston from Baltimore. On defense, there are four new men, all of them starters. They are Quinlan, Jordan and Freeman, who were obtained from Cleveland, and Tunnell, who was bought from New York. Because of Tunnell's age, 34, Lombardi kept six defensive backs instead of five. Of the 14 new men, at least eight are expected to start against the Bears Sunday - Skoronski, Thurston, McHan and Carpenter on offense and Quinlan, Jordan, Freeman and Tunnell on defense. Last year's veterans who probably will start include McGee and Knafelc (who missed most of last season with injuries), Gregg, Jerry Kramer, Horning, Taylor, Borden, Hanner, Forester, Bettis, Currie, Dillon and Whittenton. Dowler and Ron Kramer are expected to alternate with McGee and Knafelc at ends.
HAVEN'T REACHED PEAK - LOMBARDI HAS PACKERS CLICKING
SEPTEMBER 22 (Milwaukee Sentinel) - Now that the Packers have flexed their muscles to the tune of a fine 4-2 showing during the exhibition season, what can be expected of them when the games start counting next Sunday? "I'd trade 'em all (four exhibition victories) for one league win," Coach Vince Lombardi said Monday, realizing that his impressive preseason record will be tossed out the window when the battle for the blue chips begins against the Bears in Green Bay. Packer fans need not be reminded of the letdowns following undefeated preseasons in 1956 and 1957. In '56 the Packers won five straight exhibitions and finished league play with a 4-8 mark. The following year they won five and tied one on the exhibition trail and wound up 3-9 during the regular season. Last year Green Bay was able to win two of five exhibition games and ended up with its worst league record in history (1-10-1). Complacency was blamed for last year's rock bottom finish. Once the team started to lose so regularly, a defeatist complex settled over the club. Lombardi has this club where he wants it. He's picked some football players who want to play or they wouldn't be around. This is a young club, one which has nowhere near reached its peak. Its improvement, though, has even surprised Lombardi. Against the Steelers in Minneapolis Sunday, the .defensive play of the Packers was something to see. Lombardi had pegged defense as his first problem. Frequently, Lombardi's linebackers dumped Steeler quarterback Bobby Layne for losses. The Packer secondary squelched two Pittsburgh scoring threats when Bobby Dillon and Bob Freeman picked off interceptions. Nate Borden broke up another Pitt drive, recovering a fumble on the Green Bay four. "If our defense continues to improve," Lombardi said, "we'll win our share of games." Lombardi has special praise for his ends and linebackers. He singled out the play of Henry Jordan, the 6-2, 250 pound defensive tackle obtained from the Browns. Pittsburgh's great defense kept Green Bay in the hole a good share of the game. The stranglehold was broken when Lamar McHan fired completions in the rip-roaring fourth quarter. "Actually we could have broken the game wide open," Lombardi pointed out. "If Timmy Brown would have caught Bart Starr's pass, if Jim Taylor didn't fumble, if McHan didn't overthrow several times." Brown, the speedy Negro rookie from Ball State, dropped Starr's pass in the clear. Taylor fumbled after McHan's 58 yard shot to Lew Carpenter put the ball on the Steeler 26. McHan overthrew McGee and to Dowler. Both could have gone for big yardage. When asked if McHan had sewed up the opening quarterback assignment, Lombardi said, "not necessarily so." There was no question, however, who looked the best after Sunday's game.
Vince Lombardi’s first Green Bay Packers quarterbacks in July 1959. From left are Joe Francis, Babe Parilli, Bart Starr and Lamar McHan. Tom Martin photo, courtesy of the Carolyn Moes collection
​MCHAN STARTER, PACKERS GET TACKLE, NITSCHKE AT FB
SEPTEMBER 22 (Pewaukee) - These were the developments in the Packer camp Tuesday as Coach Vince Lombardi prepared for the league opener against the seven-point favorite Bears in Green Bay Sunday.
* The club acquired defensive tackle Ken Beck from the Cardinals in exchange for a future draft choice.
* Lamar McHan was picked as the starting quarterback for Sunday's lid-lifter.
* Linebacker Ray Nitschke was moved to a fullback position after rookie Dave Smith was put on waivers.
Beck, 6-2, 245 pound rookie from Texas A&M, was on the College All-Star squad before reporting to the Cardinals. He is the second defensive tackle obtained from an Eastern Division team, the Packers picking Henry Jordan, three year veteran from the Browns last week. McHan, who completed six out of 10 passes for 141 yards last Sunday against the Steelers,"knows the Bears like a book," according to Lombardi. He was instrumental in leading the Cardinals to a stunning 53-14 victory over the Bears in 1955. "I wish I knew several weeks ago what I know now about McHan," Lombardi said. "He's coming along fast - we should have played him more in preseason games." McHan, probably the happiest player in camp after learning he would start against the Bears, admitted he had been in some pretty lively scraps with the Halasmen. He called their defense "one of the best," picking out Bill George and Fred Williams as the varmints to keep out. Nitschke is no newcomer at fullback. As a regular with Illinois in 1957, he gained 514 yards in 79 carries for a 6.5 average. He led a 4-5 Illinois team in scoring with five touchdowns. In Lombardi's system, halfbacks Paul Hornung and Lew Carpenter could easily move into the fullback spot - the two positions being very similar. Nitschke is being groomed because of his tremendous desire for contact. "I guess they figure I need more running," Nitschke said with a grin. "You don't get that much chance on defense." Guard Andy Cvercko, who sustained a wrenched knee against Pittsburgh, may be put on the injured reserve list if he doesn't respond to treatment. Lombardi said the Packers would break camp Thursday afternoon, returning to Green Bay. He will not keep the players in a motel before league games, as was done last year. "They'll be on their own when we get back," Lombardi said.
​SCOUT SAYS HALAS USED 15 DEFENSES
SEPTEMBER 23 (Milwaukee Journal) - Vince Lombardi has brought the Green Bay Packers a long way from their disastrous season of last year, but whether they are ready to meet a team like the Chicago Bears may be another matter. The NFL opener at Green Bay Sunday will be a hard test for Lombardi's young and rebuilt team. "The Bears want that fast start," said Wally Cruice of Milwaukee, Green Bay's game scout. "They know they've got to have it for their first two games in Green Bay and Baltimore. Those are the crucial ones of their season, they feel. If they can split even, or even win both of them, they figure they will be on their way." Cruice has been following the Bears around the exhibition trail. He knows them well. His voluminous reports, written and spoken, supplement many reels of film as Lombardi and his assistants prepare their team at Oakton Manor, Pewaukee Lake. Against the New York Giants two weeks ago, the Bears used 15 different defenses. Most teams use three or four. Against Cleveland Saturday night, George Halas' Chicagoans added a couple of new defenses. "The Bear coaches always tell me that they throw in a few twists every week just to keep busy," Cruice said. Jerry Helluin, veteran defensive tackle who was cut loose by the Packers a month ago, has been working out with the Bears. They have not signed him to any contract nor do they apparently intend to use him, except to pump him of all the information they can get on Green Bay's methods, plays and players. "The Bears started a little flat against Cleveland," Cruice said, referring to Chicago's only exhibition defeat. The Browns won, 33-31, after the Bears had come back from a 20-0 deficit to take the lead, 31-30, with only a minute to go. "Then they put in Ed Brown at quarterback and he did the job. He had 310 yards passing in the last three quarters. He's ready for Green Bay. Hill and Dooley looked really sharp at end. Dooley has been playing terrific. They've got that great speed. And Dewveall, their new slotman, gives them good blocking and he's got speed, too. Casares never looked better, Galimore and Morris have that speed at halfback, too. That's the thing - their speed. They have that and individual ability." In the exhibition season, the Bears won five games and lost one, compared with the Packers' 4-2 record. They met in the opener at Milwaukee County Stadium and the Bears won, 19-16, with a touchdown in the last minutes. Rick Casares led the Bears in rushing in exhibitions with 316 yards in 66 tries. Willie Galimore had 160 for 34, Merrill Douglas 154 for 30 and Johnny Morris 106 for 24. Brown led the passers with 51 completions in 90 attempts for 774 yards and nine touchdowns. Zeke Bratkowski had 35 for 58 for 384 yards and four touchdowns. Owner-coach George Halas reported Tuesday in Chicago that the Bears were in top physical condition. There was some doubt, however, about linebacker Joe Fortunato, who suffered a head injury when he tackled Jim Brown late in the game. If Fortunato is not ready to play, his place will probably be taken by Larry Morris, who used to play with Los Angeles and then was traded to Washington and refused to report this season. The Bears obtained him in a trade with the Redskins recently, although they did not announce it.
HORNUNG SAYS - NO HOPING, PLAYS WORK!
SEPTEMBER 24 (Milwaukee Sentinel) - Paul Hornung stretched out on his bed after a brisk drill Wednesday morning and explained the Packers' improvement over a year ago. "Last year we hoped a play would work," Hornung said. "And this year well, you know, it will work." Vince Lombardi's confidence is rubbing off on this team as it prepares for its league opener Sunday against the Bears in Green Bay. Hornung was a misfit fullback under the previous regimes, never living up to expectations after being picked as a bonus choice. But under Lombardi's wing, Hornung is finding himself. He scored 70 of Green Bay's 118 points in six preseason games. This included six touchdowns, seven field goals and 13 extra points. Hornung credits a "700% improvement in the blocking" as the key to this year's success. Then, too, big Paul is down to 212 pounds, his lightest playing weight as a Packer. Lombardi agrees Hornung is the club's bread-and-butter back, Lombardi is impressed with Hornung's desire when he's got the ball. "But he unconsciously lets down when he's not carrying the ball," Lombardi pointed out. "This will have to be corrected." Lombardi said he would go along with veteran Max McGee as a punter against the Bears in place of rookie Boyd Dowler, who boomed a 62-yarder against the Steelers. "Max has the experience," Lombardi said. "We can't take any chance against the Bears." While winning five preseason game before losing, 33-31, to the Browns last week, the Bears averaged 350 yards rushing and passing and 33 points per game. Rick Casares accounted for more than one-third of the rushing yardage, while Jim Dooley and Harlon Hill shared half of the receiving yardage. Casares averaged 4.96 yards per rush with 316 yards. Between them, Dooley and Hill caught 49 of the 99 Bears' completions for 773 yards. Casares also led the scoring parade with seven touchdowns. Of the Bears' 27 TDs, 14 were on passes, 11 on rushes, one on Fred Williams' 77 yard pass interception and one on Willie Galimore's 85 yard kickoff return.
GREEN BAY'S STRONG DEFENSIVE BACKFIELD ASSEMBLED IN SERIES OF CHAIN REACTIONS
SEPTEMBER 24 (Milwaukee Journal) - Green Bay may well have one of the best defensive backfield in the NFL. The odd thing about it is that not one of the four men who will start in the secondary against the Chicago Bears in Green Bay Sunday was ticketed to play for the Packers this season. Vince Lombardi assembled the quartet of Bobby Freeman, Jesse Whittenton, Bobby Dillon and Emlen Tunnell in rather a chain reaction sort of way. When Lombardi took over the Packers, he had six veterans as defensive backs. Dillon, Whittenton and Billy Kinard announced their retirements. Hank Gremminger, John Symank and Alton (Monk) Romine signed to play. With Dillon and Whittenton gone, Lombardi went after replacements. He got Freeman from the Browns for a draft choice and Tunnell, 34, from the Giants for cash. Tunnell had played with the Giants for 11 seasons and they wouldn't trade him, so it had to be a straight money deal. Whittenton changed his mind and reported a week after camp started. Then Dillon made arrangements for a leave from the plastics company for which he works in Temple, Tex., and he, too, reported. So Lombardi had at his disposal two of the aces from last year and the two men he got to replace them. Romine was released and Gremminger and Symank were reduced to reserve status once Whittenton recovered from a leg injury and Dillon played his way into top shape. Freeman has been the gem of the exhibition season. There is reason to wonder how the Browns could afford to let him go. He has been almost too good to be true. At that, he has been playing with a sore leg and lame back, but he has tackled crisply and covered receivers well. He leads the team in interceptions and grades for defensive backs. Tunnell, the former Iowa star, is a well preserved 34. There is always worry that tomorrow may be the day when his legs give out, but as of now, his intelligence and experience more than make up for any speed he has lost to age and he is a rugged tackler. Around the goal line he turned into another linebacker the way he socks the ball carriers. Whittenton, who started with Los Angeles and also has a strop with the Bears, has been the surprise. Lombardi was especially impressed with the way the Texas Western speedster shadowed Harlon Hill of the Bears in the opening exhibition game here in August. If Whittenton can do any kind of a similar job against Hill at Green Bay Sunday, Packer chances will be enhanced greatly. Dillon is still Dillon, an all-league interceptor. He has that sixth sense which permits him to be back and then with a burst of speed at the last instant, steal the ball from the receiver or knock it down. He is not a rugged tackler but his pursuit ability is excellent. All this he does with one eye. He lost the other in a childhood accident. "This could be a great backfield," Lombardi said. "If our linemen can rush the passer, they will get a lot of interceptions. Right now on days when they are playing ball, the other side will have to throw a perfect pass to beat them."
BEARS MAY BE LOOKING PAST PACKERS TO COLTS
SEPTEMBER 25 (Appleton Post-Crescent) - Could the Bears be looking past their meeting with the Packers at City Stadium Sunday afternoon? The Halasmen play the Colts and Rams, generally considered to be the title favorites along with the Bears, in four of their first six games. The Bruins meet the Colts after Green Bay - in Baltimore Saturday night October 3. Two sources suggested that the Bears might have the Colts on their minds. Braven Dyer, in the Los Angeles Times, wrote the other day: "George Halas has his Chicago Bears off to their fastest start in years. Why? Probably because they face the world champion Baltimore Colts twice before October 19. Odd scheduling send the midway monsters to Baltimore on October 3 (night) and rematches them in the Windy City on October 18. If either club wins both games it could settle the Western Division right there." "Bruce Morrison. a veteran pro writer with the Chicago Sun-Times, presented this thought Thursday: "In the second game of the season, the Bears take on the Colts at Baltimore in what well may be the most crucial contest of their season. Halas reasons that his lads may be dwelling upon the possibilities of upsetting the Colts and neglect achieving a fine edge for the Pack." The Bears have a 3-game winning streak going over the Packers, not counting the non-leaguer this season. Since the Packers downed the Bruins, 21-17, in the dedication opener here in 1957, the Bears won the replay in Chicago 21-14. Last year, the Bears whipped our forces, 34-20 and 24-10. Four key figures in Sunday's clash played at the University of Arkansas - tackle Fred Williams of the Bears and Dave Hanner, Lamar McHan and Lew Carpenter of the Packers. McHan and Carpenter were sophomores when Williams and Hanner were All-American seniors. Defensive halfback Vic Zucco and linebacker Chuck Howley, both Bear veterans, may miss Sunday's game due to injuries. Linebacker Joe Fortunato, who was hurt tackling Jim Brown in the Cleveland game last Saturday night, will be ready for the Packers. The Packers worked in the privacy of the stadium this morning. And there'll be another workout there Saturday morning. The team returned from its training base in Pewaukee at 7 p.m. Thursday and went directly to a supper club for a meal and a meeting. All is quiet hereabouts - except for the moans of the folks trying to get tickets for Sunday's 32,500 sellout.
PACKERS, BEARS IN 81ST DUEL
SEPTEMBER 26 (Green Bay) - Hopes were higher than Uncle Walt on a Saturday night in every nook and corner of this great little city on the eve of the Bears-Packer game. The Bears ruled as seven point favorites, but the faithful thousands in Packerland kiss that off, jointing to the fact that their heroes rise to the occasion and then some in this classic. The game, was usual, has been sold out for months. More than 32,250 will nestle in City Stadium for the 1:06 p.m. kickoff. There will be no television in Milwaukee or Green Bay. Vince Lombardi brought his team home Thursday after being camped at Oakton Manor, Pewaukee Lake for two weeks. "I wanted to keep this team together as long as I could," Lombardi explained before leaving for Green Bay. "We should get a psychological lift when we get home." Although their preseason record of four wins and two losses was second only to the Bears (5-1), Lombardi's young Packers are tabbed no better than also rans in the Western Conference race while George Halas' Bruins are expected to fight it our with the Colts and Rams for the title. Yet, there are some things going for the Packers that can't be discarded. Defensively, Lombardi has wheeled and dealed freely to strengthen the club's major weaknesses a year ago. From the Browns he obtained end Bill Quinlan, halfback Bob Freeman and tackle Henry Jordan. Halfback Emlen Tunnell came from the Giants and tackle Ken Beck from the Cardinals. Offensively, Lombardi has installed a long lost running game. It's built around fullback Jim Taylor and halfbacks Paul Hornung, Lew Carpenter, Don McIlhenny and Timmy Brown. Just what the Packers can do against the Bears, however, will depend upon a Cardinal castoff - quarterback Lamar McHan. Lombardi picked McHan to start because of his experience against the Bears and because the former All-American has shaped up as the best prospect in the last two weeks. The Bears have a long 
history of hard-hitting and tough football. Against the Packers,they've won 48, lost 26 and tied six.
BEARS MAY BE LOOKING PAST PACKERS TO COLTS
SEPTEMBER 25 (Appleton Post-Crescent) - Could the Bears be looking past their meeting with the Packers at City Stadium Sunday afternoon? The Halasmen play the Colts and Rams, generally considered to be the title favorites along with the Bears, in four of their first six games. The Bruins meet the Colts after Green Bay - in Baltimore Saturday night October 3. Two sources suggested that the Bears might have the Colts on their minds. Braven Dyer, in the Los Angeles Times, wrote the other day: "George Halas has his Chicago Bears off to their fastest start in years. Why? Probably because they face the world champion Baltimore Colts twice before October 19. Odd scheduling send the midway monsters to Baltimore on October 3 (night) and rematches them in the Windy City on October 18. If either club wins both games it could settle the Western Division right there." "Bruce Morrison. a veteran pro writer with the Chicago Sun-Times, presented this thought Thursday: "In the second game of the season, the Bears take on the Colts at Baltimore in what well may be the most crucial contest of their season. Halas reasons that his lads may be dwelling upon the possibilities of upsetting the Colts and neglect achieving a fine edge for the Pack." The Bears have a 3-game winning streak going over the Packers, not counting the non-leaguer this season. Since the Packers downed the Bruins, 21-17, in the dedication opener here in 1957, the Bears won the replay in Chicago 21-14. Last year, the Bears whipped our forces, 34-20 and 24-10. Four key figures in Sunday's clash played at the University of Arkansas - tackle Fred Williams of the Bears and Dave Hanner, Lamar McHan and Lew Carpenter of the Packers. McHan and Carpenter were sophomores when Williams and Hanner were All-American seniors. Defensive halfback Vic Zucco and linebacker Chuck Howley, both Bear veterans, may miss Sunday's game due to injuries. Linebacker Joe Fortunato, who was hurt tackling Jim Brown in the Cleveland game last Saturday night, will be ready for the Packers. The Packers worked in the privacy of the stadium this morning. And there'll be another workout there Saturday morning. The team returned from its training base in Pewaukee at 7 p.m. Thursday and went directly to a supper club for a meal and a meeting. All is quiet hereabouts - except for the moans of the folks trying to get tickets for Sunday's 32,500 sellout.
PACKERS, BEARS IN 81ST DUEL
SEPTEMBER 26 (Green Bay) - Hopes were higher than Uncle Walt on a Saturday night in every nook and corner of this great little city on the eve of the Bears-Packer game. The Bears ruled as seven point favorites, but the faithful thousands in Packerland kiss that off, jointing to the fact that their heroes rise to the occasion and then some in this classic. The game, was usual, has been sold out for months. More than 32,250 will nestle in City Stadium for the 1:06 p.m. kickoff. There will be no television in Milwaukee or Green Bay. Vince Lombardi brought his team home Thursday after being camped at Oakton Manor, Pewaukee Lake for two weeks. "I wanted to keep this team together as long as I could," Lombardi explained before leaving for Green Bay. "We should get a psychological lift when we get home." Although their preseason record of four wins and two losses was second only to the Bears (5-1), Lombardi's young Packers are tabbed no better than also rans in the Western Conference race while George Halas' Bruins are expected to fight it our with the Colts and Rams for the title. Yet, there are some things going for the Packers that can't be discarded. Defensively, Lombardi has wheeled and dealed freely to strengthen the club's major weaknesses a year ago. From the Browns he obtained end Bill Quinlan, halfback Bob Freeman and tackle Henry Jordan. Halfback Emlen Tunnell came from the Giants and tackle Ken Beck from the Cardinals. Offensively, Lombardi has installed a long lost running game. It's built around fullback Jim Taylor and halfbacks Paul Hornung, Lew Carpenter, Don McIlhenny and Timmy Brown. Just what the Packers can do against the Bears, however, will depend upon a Cardinal castoff - quarterback Lamar McHan. Lombardi picked McHan to start because of his experience against the Bears and because the former All-American has shaped up as the best prospect in the last two weeks. The Bears have a long history of hard-hitting and tough football. Against the Packers,they've won 48, lost 26 and tied six.
BEARS PLAY AT GREEN BAY
SEPTEMBER 26 (Green Bay) - Green Bay open its 40th
anniversary season here Sunday before a capacity throng
of 32,150 against the Chicago Bears, one of the 
preseason favorites in the NFL championship race. The
Packers, who with the Bears have been the chief
contributors to professional football down through the
years, start the campaign in an atmosphere of confidence
and enthusiasm. Led by Vince Lombardi, the No. 1 man
in Packer football now, and overhauled since the
disappointing 1958 showing, the ream, the town and the
surrounding countryside hope for a season as auspicious
as that enjoyed by the original Packer eleven back in
1919 when Curly Lambeau directed a home talent
aggregation to victory after victory over all opponents
courageous enough to show up for battle. Lombardi, hired
away from the New York Giants to restore the Packers to
the position of power and prominence they gained under
Lambeau, will field a team vastly improved over the 1958
club which won only one game, tied one and lost 10. It
still lacks the size Lombardi would like and may find
necessary for steady success in the western division, but
it probably will prove itself to have the fastest overall
​speed in the league. Averaging out at just over 24 years
of age, Green Bay will be the youngest squad in the race,
a circumstance that fits in perfectly with Lombardi's plans
for the future. The big need, in addition to more size, is
quarterbacking. Lamar McHan, once the hope of the
Chicago Cardinals, will start against the Bears. He is
backed up by Bart Starr, a fourth year pro, who has
everything to make him a top notch quarterback except luck. "Nothing ever seems to go right for Starr," says Lombardi. "He threw two perfect touchdown passes against Pittsburgh, for instance, and the receivers dropped them." McHan and Starr will have veterans Max McGee and Gary Knafelc as targets at the outset, but before the afternoon is over Boyd Dowler and A.D. Williams, a pair of rookies, will be at the ends. Lombardi considers Dowler from Colorado and Williams from College of the Pacific, the best offensive end prospects in the league. Dowler, 6 feet 5 and 214 pounds, was a member of the Chicago All-Star squad last month. Williams is 6 feet 2 and weighs 210 pounds.
Green Bay Packers (4-2) 13, Pittsburgh Steelers (2-4) 10
EXHIBITION - Sunday September 20th 1959 (at Minneapolis)